IT'S ABOUT TIME
VOLUME IV

CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH NOTES
ON SOME OF THE PATERNAL ANCESTORS, DESCENDANTS,
AND COLLATERAL LINES, OF
FREDERICK PERRY DECOURSEY (1900-1978)

Including the families of
BOS, BRADT, CAUDEBEC, COMSTOCK, CORSA, CORSEN, CRAY, CUVILJE,
DAMEN, DECKER, DECOURSEY, DEFOREST, DEPUY, HOOGES, HELMICK, KIP,
LENT, MONTAGNE, OBLINIS, PROVOOST, RAPALJE, ROSENKRANS, ROOSA,
RYCKEN, SCHOONMAKER, VANAKEN, VANGORDEN, VERBRUGGE, VERMILYEA,
VIGNE, VOLKERTSEN

compiled by
WILLIAM L DECOURSEY
1735 - 19th TERRACE NW
NEW BRIGHTON, MINNESOTA 55112
(612)-633-5759

1430The CROY family "was an old Picard family; but when Picardy was under Phillip, Duke of Burgundy, Jean de CROY, grandsire of Charles, attached himself to that potent duke, who made him a knight of the Golden Fleece, when he first instituted that order at Bruges, in 1430."
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904),pp.30-33.
1482Charles de CROY took his title from the estate of Chimay, to which he fell heir, in 1482, on the death of his father Philip, and which was erected into a principality four years later by the Emperor Maximilian, whose son Philip, King of Spain, conferred on the new prince the additional honors of the Golden Fleece.
1495Charles de CROY, Prince of Chimay, married, in 1495, to Louise, Lady of Avesnes, daughter of Lord ALLAN d'Albret. It was by this marriage that the Land of Avesnes came into the possession of the CROYS.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.30-33.
1500s16th Century - The seat of many of our ancestors in the 15th and 16th century was in the area of Roune, Lille, and Avense in Belgium (now part of northern France).

Some of the genealogy of the Walloon families of deCOURCY, deCROY (CRAY), PROVOOST, MONTAGNE, duCHESNE, VERBRUG, TRUEX, VIGNE, CUVEILLE (VEILE), CAUDEBEC, etc. can be found in the 10 volume work of
Pol-Louise Potier deCourcy, HISTOIRE GENEALOGIQUE et CHRONOLOGIQUE de la MAISON ROYALE de FRANCE (Paris 1726), Minnesota Historical Society Library #CS586/ff.A6/1726.

It is evident that many of these Walloon families were merchants and seamen who, with their families, were settlers in the early Dutch colonies at Recife, Brazil and New Amsterdam. Branches of these families still reside in Brazil and the Antilles.

Some of our early Walloon ancestors most probably were merchants and mariners operating out of the port of Bruges, Belgium which was the market center of Europe in the late 16th Century.

1508The famous scholar, Jacques LeFEVRE of E'taples in Picardy, made the first translations of the holy gospels into French about 1508. Editions printed in Antwerp were used by early Walloons and Huguenots in the awakening of a new religious life. LeFEVRE's student, Jean CALVIN (1509-1564), concluded that a new church must break away from Catholicism. In 1536 he took refuge in the free intellectual climate of Switzerland, and there he published his INSTITUTES OF CHRISTIANITY. In Geneva, he founded a new church and trained numerous French refugees to become successful Huguenot missionaries and pastors in their native land. By 1559, a French Reformed Church, following Calvin's tenets, was formally constituted. The influence of CALVIN's beliefs had also extended to the Reformed Churches of Holland, Scotland, and parts of Germany.
William Heidgerd, ROOTS OF THE NEW PALTZ REFORMED CHURCH (1983), p.4.
1516"Pietro Martire VEMIGLI (1500-1562) was a leader of the Protestant Reformation. Born in Florence, he became an Augustinian monk at Fiesole in 1516. In 1541 he accepted the views of the Protestant Reformation and was compelled to flee to Switzerland, from there he went to Strassburg where he became a professor of theology in 1542. He was invited by CRANMER to come to England, and in 1547 was appointed by Edward VI, regius professor of divinity at Oxford. Under Queen Mary he was driven from England and resumed his teaching in Strassburg, 1553. In 1556, he became professor of Hebrew at Zurich. Later he went to Holland where he married and taught.
YESTERYEARS, v.8, p.1.
1527Frances, Lady of Avesnes, eldest daughter and heiress of prince Charles de CROY, married her kinsman, Philip de CROY, -- for their parents were cousins, --- the latter took the estates on the death of his father-in-law, in 1527, the next year further securing the land of Avesnes to his house by a release obtained from Henry d'Albert, King of Navarre, cousin to his wife, and grandfather of Henry IV of France.
1533Philip de CROY, prince of Chimay and Knight of the Fleece, rendered important service with his Walloon troop in the war between France and Spain; and Charles V, in 1533, showed his love for his "nephew" by giving him the title of Duke of Arschot, from an estate he held in Brahant; and after the destructive war of 1543, Philip de CROY, Duke of Arschot, was created a grandee of Spain.
1549Philip de CROY, Duke of Arschot and grandee of Spain, died in 1549, leaving his heirs such rich possessions and dignities, the family of CROY became "of greatest revenue and authority of any in Belgium." Philip, second duke, now enjoying his father's titles and estates, including Avesnes, had great influence in governmental affairs, as had also his brother, Charles CROY, Marquis of Havre, in Hainault. "Great destinies were in the grasp of this influential family. Time was to eliminate, as one of the results, an humble transatlantic enterprise, to which some of their born subjects were to contribute."
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.30-33.
1551Brickje Janssen RAPALJI, dau. of Gaspard Colet RUPOLJE, of Paris France, and Breckje JANSSEN of Holland, was born 1551, at Antwerp, Holland. She married Victoire Honoires JANSSEN, son of Victor Antoine JANSSEN.
1555Admiral Gaspard de COLIGNY unsuccessfully attempted to establish Huguenot Protestant colonies at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 1555 and in Florida in 1562-1564. Among those in his service was Antoine de CROY, who, in opposition to his kinsmen, embraced the Reformed religion.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.11,.
1555The first Protestant settlement in America was the French Reformed colony in Brazil in 1555. In 1558, one of the party by the name of VERMEIL was martyred at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. See:
Rev. Prof. James I Good, D.D., HISTORY OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE UNITED STATES (1899), p.7,ll, passim.
(Some of our DECOURSEY ancestors were associated with the VERMILYE family for about two centuries.)
1564Archbishop De BERGHES, who was lord temporal as well as spiritual of the Cambresis, in order to check the growing disaffection of the church, in 1564, fulminated an edict against the practice of attending the so-called Reformed preaching, reading heretical books, or chanting the psalms of Marot and Beza. This seemed to have little effect, for the numbers of the Reformed church rapidly increased, in Avesne and vicinity; and Rev. PHILLIPPE, minister of the church of Tupigny, by invitation preached for them many times in the faubourgs of the city, and organized a church, with a consistory of ten members.
1566In August 1566, Archbishop De BERGHES sent his emissary, Dr. GEMELLI, to to warn the Protestants of Le Cateau (a village near Avesnes) of dire consequences if they should not at once return to the Roman Catholic Church. Shortly following his visit, news reached Le Cateau from Valenciennes, a large Walloon town fifteen miles north of Avesnes, that the people there had cast out all the images, relics, and other symbols of Romanism from their churches, and that the same had also been done in many other cities. The citizens of Le Cateau, under the leadership of Rev. PHILLIPE, proceeded to the church of St. Martins, 25 August 1666, to follow this example, and claim their right to order their worship as they pleased.

Three couples were joined in marriage, 15 December 1666, by Rev. PHILLIPE, at St. Martins. One of the brides was the daughter of Jean De FOREST, then living at Le Cateau.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.34-36.

1569Abram JANSSEN, son of Victoire Honoires JANSSEN and Brickje Janssen RAPALJIE, was born 1569, in Holland
1570cPeter deCOURSE was born c.1570 near Lille, France (then Belgium). He was a Walloon merchant and trader. As a mariner in the employee of the Dutch East India Company, he was, it is said, at the site of New Amsterdam as early as 1612. He traded extensively with the Dutch outposts and colonies in Brazil and North America. He probably had the following children:

(1). Jan CORSSE or CORSSEN, married 1619 in Amsterdam, Holland to Tryntje "Catherine" Van CAMPEN - Note that a Tryntje Van CAMPEN witnessed the baptism of a child of Jan CORSZEN and Metje Theunis CRAY in 1676.
See Woodruff, p.1; Clute, p.359; Percival Ullman, pp.15-17.

(2). Arendt CORSSE STAM, died 1645 at sea; married, 26 January 1638 at Amsterdam to Angenetta Gillis VERBRUG (also known as Angenietie Gillis Ten Vaert), dau. of Gillis Jansen VERBRUGGE and Barbara SCHUT. His widow married Johannes de la MONTAGNE, an official of the Dutch West India Company.
See REGISTER OF NEW NETHERLAND, p.49.

(3). Dirck CORSSE STAM, born 1608, commissary for Killian Van RENSELLAER at Fort Orange (now Albany, NY).

(4). Cornelius COURSEN (also known as Cornelis PIETERSE VROOM), born probably at Langeraer Holland in the year 1612, died 1655, married Tryntje HENDRICKS, dau. of Hendrick TOMASSEN and Elsie MARTENSE.
Orville Corson, THREE HUNDRED YEARS with the CORSON FAMILIES, vol.I & II; Cuyler Reynold, GENE. & FAMILY HISTORY OF SOUTHERN NEW YORK (1914), v.II,p.617;
O'Callaghan's NEW YORK COLONIAL Mss., v.1,p.72;
Percival Ullman THE COURSENS;
Rosalie Fellows Bailey, DUTCH SYSTEMS IN FAMILY NAMING (Reprint No. 12, from the NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY - March 1953, Dec. 1953), p.10.

(5). Paulina CORSSEN married, in Holland, Jasper GREVENRAET. Their dau. Janneke GREVENRAET m. Cornelis van de VEN (
NY.GEN.BIOG.REC, v.64,p.149).

Cornelis van de VEN and Janneke GREVENRAET baptized a child in Recife, Brazil in 1644
(NY.GEN.BIOG.REC. v.61,p.245).

Abraham GREVENRAET was sent by his father Hendrick GREVENRAET, merchant of Amsterdam, with Dirck CORSSEN STAM to purchase a cargo of tobacco in Virginia, 1630.
(N.Y.Gen. & Biog.Rec. v.61,p.245.)

For GREVENRAET see also
N.Y.Gen. & Biog.Rec. v.13,p.10, v.60,p.202, v.61,p.41, v.63,p.10-21.

For more on Pieter duCOURS, DeCOURSE, or duCOURSEN, see
Ullman's THE COURSENS (1918);
Florence Youngs' CORSON FAMILY mss. at Wisc. Hist. Soc. Library.

See also:
INDEX OF POTENTIAL HUGUENOT ANCESTORS, 1,-369;394;582;806;813;945;1029;1334;1773;1861;2035; 2,-257;616; 3,-124;J28;.
Malcom B. Gilman, THE HUGUENOT MIGRATION IN EUROPE AND AMERICA (1962).
Wilfred Jordan, ed. COLONIAL & REVOLUTIONARY FAMILIES OF PENNSYLVANIA, v.XV, p.132-133.


The FIFTH EDITION OF HUGUENOT ANCESTORS mentions that a COURSIER from L'Isle de Re' settled at Narragansett. This is interesting because of the occasional use of the d'Lisle prefix by some of the DeCoursey family later. See also THE ANCESTOR QUARTERLY (Westminster, England), v.I, p.243-247 for an interesting relationship between the de COURCI, Fitz GEROLD and the de L'Isle Family in the thirteenth and fourteenth century.

1572Initial toleration of the Calvinists and the Reformed Church movement soon broke down in France. Twenty Thousand Protestants perished in the Massacre of St. Bartholomew on 24 August 1572. A period of sporadic civil wars followed. Large numbers of merchants in the upper and middle classes from the northern provinces fled singly or in small groups to England and the Netherlands.
Baird's HISTORY OF THE HUGUENOTS IN AMERICA, Vol.I, pp.149,167,175,352,354;
Woodruff, Francis E., THE COURSENS OF SUSSEX COUNTY, NEW JERSEY, p.15;
William Heidgerd, ROOTS OF THE NEW PALTZ REFORMED CHURCH (1983), p.5;
Harry T. Gumaer, A MINISINK FRAGMENT (1981), p.1-3.
1579In 1579, Holland, Zeeland, Gelderland, and other provinces united into a free republic known as the Seven United Provinces; achieving, after a long struggle, their independence from Spain and the Papacy. But the remaining Netherlands relapsed into a more servile bondage to Spain and the Pope. The king allowed the Protestant Walloons two years in which either to "return to the bosom of the church" or leave the country. Thousands of Walloons sought safety in exile.

Antoine de CROY was among those who embraced the Reformed religion, and had attached himself with the fortunes of Admiral COLIGNY; and another kinsman, William ROBERT, Prince of Sedan had generously opened his gates to their persecuted and fleeing subjects, with whose faith and trials he was in sympathy.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.37-38.

1580Jesse de FOREST was born, ca.1580, in Avesnes, Belgis Soil of Hainault. "He was a splendid type of Walloon, gifted with energy, initiative, and perseverance, and he used these qualities for the benefit and welfare of his countrymen."
Henry G. Bayer, THE BELGIANS FIRST SETTLERS IN NEW YORK (1925), p.139.
1584Walloon refugees established a church at Leyden, Holland, in 1584.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.74.
1585In the writings on "The Troubles brought to Valenciennes on account of Heresies," one notes that the names De la VIGNE and CUVELIER (the latter the French equivalent of the Dutch CUVILJE) frequently occur in the index of victims of the Spanish Inquisition. Surviving relatives likely fled religious persecution to tolerant Holland. There, a Jean de la VIGNE served as Amsterdam's Walloon dominie from 1585 to 1622; and there, in 1613 or earlier, a Guillaume de la VIGNE and Adrienne CUVELIER evidently found employment in expanding Dutch Commerce, and their names became Dutchified.
NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY RECORD, v.90, pp.2-14.
1587A Jacob SCHUHMACHER and his wife Johannet, are mentioned at Hirtel, Germany in 1587. Their son was one Godmann SCHUHMACHER, mentioned in documents dated 1590 and 1592, who had a son (Jost) Quirin SCHUHMACHER of Hirtel who married Anna --?--; his son was Hans Joachim SCHUHMACHER of Hirtel who married twice; and a son of this Hans Joachim SCHUHMACHER was Hans Jacob SCHUMACHER who married Marie LORENTZ, daughter of Joh. Sebastian LORENTZ. Daniel SCHUMACHER, son of Hans Jacob and Marie (LORENTZ) SCHUMACHER, came to America in 1710, and was undoubtedly the "Daniel SCHOONMAKER who was sponsor at the baptism of Daniel LAWRENCE, son of Johannes LORENTZ, 13 December 1713.
Henry Z. Jones, Jr., THE PALATINE FAMILIES OF NEW YORK (1985), pp.938-939, passim.

It is not known whether there were earlier connections between our Henrick Jochemsz SCHOONMAKER and this SCHUHMACHER family, but Chambers in his EARLY GERMANS OF NEW JERSEY suggests a possible relationship between these later 1710 Palatine families and earlier settlers in New Paltz.

1595Dr. Johannes La MONTAGNE was born, 1595, at Saintonge. "La MONTAGNE was not his family name, but an adjunct which finally took the place of the former, and was originally derived, ---as correlative facts seem to indicate, ---from La MONTAGNE, a district of Burgundy."
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.48;
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.21n.
1595"At Avesnes, which since the year 1559 had had a Spanish garrison, the new (Calvinistic) religion found no toleration; yet, nevertheless, some of its worthy people, members of its old De FOREST family included, had embraced the new faith, though this exposed them to imminent peril; for woe to him who dared avow that heresy or quit the old church.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.33.

Among the first Walloon families who were "the first to flee their country were those of De FOREST and VERMEILLE or VERMILYE, the latter, in the troubles of the sixteenth century, taking refuge in England."
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.48.

1595Many wealthy protestant Walloon families from northern France and Belgium exiled to Holland before 1595 to escape Religious persecution. "Protestantism made some headway in Wallonia in the 16th century, but the Spanish Habsburgs (who had come into power through marriages and inheritances upon the death of Mary of Burgundy) were able to prevent the Belgian provinces from attaining their independence as did the northern provinces, and were also successful in stamping out Protestantism by employing ruthless measures, including the Inquisition. Because of Spanish religious oppression, some Walloon Protestants fled to the neighborhood of Leiden in the Netherlands; here they developed plans for emigrating to the New World and may have had contacts with the Mayflower Pilgrims. In 1624 a goodly company of them left the Netherlands to settle in New Amsterdam (now New York).
ENCYCLOPEDIA AMERICAN (1965), vol.28, p.303.
1595Coenraet van GREVENRAET "swaertveger' (sword maker) was accepted as a burgher of Amsterdam, Holland on 8 May 1595.
1596Joris Jans Janssen de RAPALJI, son of Abram JANSSEN, was bapt. 24 August 1596, at LaRochelle, France. He married 1623, to Caroline TRICO.
1598The Edict of Nantes was signed by Henry IV on 13 April 1598. The Edict permitted the previously persecuted Protestants to hold any office, to organize their family lives, to hold religious gatherings and to possess special towns as places of refuge; but from the day of its issue, its power was curbed bit by bit, until finally the Edict was revoked in 1685.
Harry T. Gumaer, A MINISINK FRAGMENT (1981), p.1-4.
1600Jean VERMEILLE, born ca.1575 at Leyden, Holland, married ca.1600, to Marie ROUBLET.
1600c.Paulina CORSSEN married, ca.1600, in Holland, Jasper GREVENRAET. Their dau. Janneke GREVENRAET m. Cornelis van de VEN (NY.GEN.BIOG.REC, v.64,p.149). Cornelis van de VEN and Janneke GREVENRAET baptized a child in Recife, Brazil in 1644. (
NY.GEN.BIOG.REC. v.61,p.245). For GREVENRAET see also
N.Y.Gen. & Biog.Rec. v.13,p.10, v.60,p.202, v.61,p.41, v.63,p.10-21.
1600The BRATT family lived in Bergen, Norway, before the early part of the fifteenth century, when it moved to the northern part of Gudbrandsdalen. The BRATTS had a coat of arms until about the middle of the sixteenth century.
1601Jean and Marie (ROUBLET) VERMIELLE fled to England in the latter part of the 16th century, and had several children born at London. Among these was Isaac VERMILYE, born 1601. He married Jacomina JACOBS.
1602David DAMMAN married, (intent) 14 April 1602, at Middleburg in Zeeland, to Esther PROVOOST, bp. 13 Sept. 1574 at Antwerp, dau. of Willem and Maeijken (STEVENS) PROVOOST.
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203.
1603Anna, a child of Jasper GRAVENRAET and Pouwelijntje CORSSEN, was baptized 14 Oct. 1603, Amsterdam, Nieuwe Kerk, Holland.
D.T.B. No.39; N.Y.G. & B.R., v.63, p.10.
1606In 1606, the Walloons at Leyden, Holland founded a college, for the better training of their youth in their favorite Calvinistic theology.
1606Henry De FOREST, son of Jesse De FOREST, was born 1606.
1607Janneken, a child of Jasper GRAVENRAET and Pouwelijntje CORSSEN, was baptized 27 May 1607, Amsterdam, Nieuwe Kerk, Holland. D.T.B. No.39; N.Y.G. & B.R., v.63, p.10. Janneken GREVENRAET married Cornelis van der VEN and removed to Recife, Brazil, where they had children baptized.
1609Rebecca VERMEILLE, daughter of Jean and Marie (ROUBLEY) VERMIELLE, was born in London, England, in 1609.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.104.
1610Kaspar, a child of Jasper GRAVENRAET and Pouwelijntje CORSSEN, was baptized 16 May 1610, Amsterdam, Nieuwe Kerk, Holland.
D.T.B. No.4; N.Y.G. & B.R., v.63, p.10.
1610Jesse DeFOREST of Avesnes, Belgium, married (probably second), 23 September 1610, in Sedan, France, Marie du CLOUX. Jesse DeFOREST had children: Jean; Henry; Rachel; Jesse; and Isaac. Jesse DeFOREST was the leader in agitating the proposed migration of the Walloons to America. According to No. 12 of the Report of Virlet d'AOUST on Geography for 1871, the greater part of the Walloon Colonist to America of 1623 were from the area of Avesnes (near the present border of France and Belgium), and they first named the settlement at Manhattan, "Nouvelle Avesnes".
Daughters of the American Colonists, LINEAGE BOOK, vol.XII, pp.226-228, #11643;
Theo. L. Van Norden, THE VAN NORDEN FAMILY (1923), pp.69;
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.70-91, passim.

Following his marriage, Jesse DeFOREST, along with his brothers Gerard, Jean, Michael, and a sister Jeanne (whose husband was one CARTIER, from Columbier, France), removed down the Maas to Holland, and resided in the "Gasthuys Quarter" of Leyden. Jesse and Gerard De FOREST were by occupation dyers of cloth.

1611Gerard de FOREST, of Avesnes, married at Leyden, 12 August 1611, to Hester, daughter of Crispin and Agnes de la GRANGE.
1611Sr. Jasper GREVENRAET, a merchant at Ypres, Belgium is mentioned 2 Oct 1611, in protocol No. 48 of Notary Public Jacob DUYFHUYSEN in Rotterdam, Holland. NY.GEN.BIOG.REC., v.64,p.149. It is noted that one of the sponsors in the baptism in Brazil claimed by Woodruff as being that of Jan CORSZEN in Brazil is "Ypes Ypesen" (evidently from the same place as the GREVENRAETS. - It also should be noted, however that Woodruffs assumptions on this baptism have been called into question by many and are no longer accepted as valid by most.
See Francis E. Woodruff, THE COURSENS OF SUSSEX COUNTY, NEW JERSEY - A reprint from THE WOODRUFFS OF NEW JERSEY.
1611Agniet GILLIS, daughter of Gillis Jochem Ten WAERT [VERBRUGE] and his wife, Beicken SCHUTS, was baptized, 1 December 1611, at Amsterdam, Holland. She married first, 17 May 1633, at Amsterdam to Elias PROVOOST, bapt. 24 Oct. 1606, the son of Guilliame PROVOOST and Jenneke EERDEWIJNS. Elias PROVOOST died, July 1636, and his widow, Agniet Gillis, married second, 26 January 1638, at Amsterdam, to Arent CORSSEN STAM, born 1615 in Amsterdam, son of Cors SETTEN and Annetje GERRITS [sic]. Arent CORSSEN STAM died at sea and his widow, Agniet GILLIS, married third, on 18 August 1647 at New Amsterdam, to Johannes de la MONTAGNE, widower of Rachel DeFOREST.
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203-207.
1612At Leiden, Holland, 12 April 1613, Jean de CROY had a child baptized in the Walloon church.
1612"Peter COURSEN, grand-father of Cornelis COURSEN, came as a soldier, in 1612(?); if so, oldest New York family. His son of the same name died on Staten Island, 1657, and his grand son, same name, Justice of Staten Island, born 1645."
Orra Eugene Monnette, FIRST SETTLERS OF PISCATAWAY AND WOODBRIDGE (1930), pp.126, 489, 1219.
1612Elysabet, a child of Jasper GRAVENRAET and Pouwelijntje CORSSEN, was baptized 25 Nov. 1612, Amsterdam, Nieuwe Kerk, Holland.
D.T.B. No.5; N.Y.G. & B.R., v.63, p.10.
1612Harmen Hendrick ROSENKRANS was born 1612, at Bergen, Norway.
1613Gulian VIGNE was an Officer at the site of New Amsterdam in 1613. He and his wife, Adrienne CUVEILLE, were probably members of the crew of the Dutch trading ship "Tiger," which caught fire, in 1613, off Manhattan Island and was beached. The ship's crew wintered in huts on the southern shoulder (at about 39 Broadway) of Manhattan, and thus established the first settlement in what is now New York. It is evident that "some Hollanders," probably including the VIGNE's, stayed continuously in New Netherland from 1613 on. Governor Sir Fernando GORGES of Virginia reported to the English government that Captain Thomas DERMER, while sailing down the Atlantic seaboard in 1620, had conferred with "some Hollanders that were settled in a place we call Hudson's river, in trade with the natives." In laying out the fort and bouweries on Manhattan, in 1625 when the regular colonization of the island began, Kryn FREDERICKS, the engineer for the Dutch West India Company, passed over the near and nice bouwery site which was to turn up later as property of Guleyn VIGNE's widow, for the engineer had been instructed not to displace any settler from land already cultivated.
Thomas Maxwell Potts, OUR FAMILY ANCESTORS (1895), pg.81-;
Mrs. Schuyler van Rensselaer, HISTORY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK IN THE 17th CENTURY, Vol.I, p.70-;
NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY RECORD, v.90, pp.5-7;
THE SECOND BOAT, v.1, No.2, p.18; NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY, Vol.XXXV, No.3, pp.65-69.

Guleyn VIGNE and Adriana CUVILJE had children: John VIGNE; Maria VIGNE married Abram VERPLANCK; Christiana VIGNE married Dirck VOLCKERTSZEN of Bushwick; and Rachel VIGNE married Cornelius van TIENHOVEN.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.322n.

1614Jean VIGNE (1614-1691), son of Julian VIGNE and Adrianna CUVEILLE was "the first male born of Europeans in New Netherlands" according to the JOURNAL OF JASPER DANCKAERTS (September 1679). He served for several years as magistrate of New Amsterdam. His sister, Christina VIGNE married c.1630 to Dirck VOLKERTSZEN. See also
O'Callaghan, v.2,p.322n;
NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY RECORD, v.90, p.2;
THE SECOND BOAT, v.1, No.2, p.18.
1614There was a Dirck VOLCKERTSEN and a Cornelius VOLCKERTSEN in Horn, who as early as 1614 had mercantile interests in the New World; but, according to Evjen, they remained in Europe.
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), p.68.
1616Isaac De FOREST, son of Jesse and Maria (du CLOUX) De FOREST, was born in 1616. He married, 1641, to Sarah duTRIEUX, dau. of Philip duTRIEUX.
1617A Henrik ROSENKRANS, between 1617 and 1629, obtained permission to the fishery of herring and whales at the coast of Greenland and Norway.
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), p.68.
1617Marye du TRIEUX, dau. of Phillip du TRIEUX and Jacqueline NOIRET, was baptized, 5 Apr 1617, in the Walloon Church at Leiden, Holland. She married (1) Cornelis VOLKERTZEN and (2) Jan PEECK. She was a half-sister of Sarah du TRIEUX who married, 1641, to Isaac DeFOREST.
1617Margriet, daughter of Gillis Jochems Ten WAERT [VERBRUGGE] and Beicken [Barbara] SCHUTS, was bapt. 17 December 1617, at Amsterdam, Holland. She married, 10 August 1637 at Amsterdam, to David PROVOOST, winedealer, bapt. 11 August 1611, Amsterdam, son of Guilliame PROVOOST and Jenneke EERDEWIJNS.
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203-207.
1618The Thirty Years War broke out in Germany in 1618. Small Protestant groups, whose stable position in European civilization was still insecure, were determined to break off from this condition by military means. Their cause seemed hopeless against the power of the Hapsburgs.
1619Jan CORSSE or CORSSEN married, 1619, at Amsterdam, to Tryntje VANCAMPEN. His widow may have been the Tryntje VanCAMPEN that married Thuenis CRAY and had son Thuenis who was father of Metje THUENIS CRAY who married 1673 Jan CORSZEN. This Thuenis CRAY was son of Gerrit deCROY; had come from Venlo in the Netherlands; and was an inn-keeper and tapster by profession. His wife, Tryntje van CAMPEN was appointed by the Dutch to serve meals to the prisoners.
John H. Innis NEW AMSTERDAM and its PEOPLE;
Berthold Fernow, RECORDS OF NEW AMSTERDAM, v.I, p.192;
SEVERSMITH - SMITH GENEALOGY, p.22-23;
Dorothy Niebrugge Hults, NEW AMSTERDAM DAYS AND WAYS (1963), p.150; N.Y.G.&B.R., Vol.5, p.9.

Note that a Tryntje Van CAMPEN witnessed the baptism of a child of Jan CORSZEN and Metje Theunis CRAY in 1676. See
Woodruff, p.1; Clute, p.359; Percival Ullman, pp.15-17.

1619Johannes Monerius Montanus (Jean MOUSNIER de la MONTAGNE), age 24, registered as a student at the University of Leyden, Holland on 19 November 1619, to study medicine under the learned HEURNIUS. De la MONTAGNE was a boarder in the family of one Robert BOTACK, a shoemaker on the Voldersgraft; and he attended the French Reformed Church.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.70-91, passim.
1620cJan Jansen VanBREESTEDE married Engeltje JANSE and had 4 children: Jan m. Marritje LUCAS and remained in Manhattan; Tryntje m. Rutger Jacobse vanSCHOENDERWORT, progenitor of the RUTGERS family; Dorothy m. Volckert Janszen DOUW, who settled Hurley; and Elsie m. (1) Adrian PIETERSEN, m. (2) Hendrick Jochemsz SCHOONMAKER, m. (3) Cornelis Barentsen SLEGHT. It appears that Jan Jansen VanBREESTEDE may have married, as his second wife, Marritje ANDRIES, daughter of Andries LUYCASZEN and Jannete SYBYNS. See
Hood, Dellman O. THE TUNIS HOOD FAMILY (Portland, Oregon 1960), pp.12-20, passim.
1621c"Some of the fugitive Walloons retired at first into Flanders, hesitating, perhaps, to quit the country, as the state of the Protestant was somewhat improved under the more humane rule of Philip IV. The family of OBLINUS fled from Houplines, two leagues northwest of Lille; and that of DePRE, from Comines, a few miles below Houplines."
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.67,67n.
1621On 28 March 1621, Jean de CROY baptized a child in the Walloon Church at Leiden, Holland.
1621Phillip deTRIEUX, widower, of Robey (Robaix) Department du Nord, France, married second, 17 Jul 1621, in the Walloon Church of Leiden, Holland to Susanna deCHESNE, born, 1601, of Sedan, assisted by Jean PINSON, her cousin.
NY.GEN.&BIOG.REC. v.57,p.216.

Their daughter, Sarah DuTRIEUX married, 1641, to Isaac DeFOREST. See
THE SECOND BOAT, v.3, p.50-52; NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD (JULY 1926).

1621Jesse deFOREST presented a petition to the British Ambassador at the Hague, 31 July 1621, to settle in Virginia. The British conditionally accepted the offer, 12 August 1621; but when unacceptable restrictions were put on by the English authorities, the Walloon traders turned to the Dutch and the "Dutch West India Company" was formed to trade with the Indians in America at the Dutch colonies in Brazil and New Amsterdam. Jesse deFOREST's eldest son, Jan deFOREST, married Maria VERMEULEN or VERMILLYA. See also
O'Callaghan, v.I, p.186n;
Henry G. Bayer, THE BELGIANS FIRST SETTLERS IN NEW YORK (1925);
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.70-91
O'Callaghan, DOCUMENTS RELATING TO THE COLONIAL HISTORY OF NEW YORK, vol.III, p.9.
1621A "Promise of certain Walloons and French to Emigrate to Virginia", written in French and dated 5 February 1621, was submitted to Sir Dudley CARLETON, British Ambassador in Holland. This petition applied for permission to settle in Virginia, fifty or sixty families, Walloon and French, all of the reformed religion. Among the signatures are those of Mousnier de la MONTAGNE, medical student; Mousnier de la MONTAGNE, apothecary and surgeon; Henry LAMBERT, woolen draper; Jan DeCROY (CRAY), sawyer with wife and five children; Pierre QUESNEE (CHESNE), brewer; Jesse DeFOREST, dyer with wife and five children; Jan GILLE (VERBRUGGE?), labourer with wife and three children; Jan DeTROU (deTRIEUX), wool carder, with wife and five children; Jean CAMPION, wool carder; Philippe CAMPION, draper; et.al.
See John C. Hotten, THE ORIGINAL LISTS OF PERSONS OF QUALITY (1880), Reprinted 1968., p196-198;
Henry G. Bayer, THE BELGIANS FIRST SETTLERS IN NEW YORK (1925), pp.138-148;
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.82-91.

(Note: The "Walloons" are often classed as "Huguenots", and descent from them is accepted by the Huguenot Society; however, they were a distinct group separate from the Huguenots from the South of France. Most of them were from the upper class merchants and aristocracy of Belgium and Northern France who could afford to exile to escape religious persecution.)

1621In 1621, Jan de CROY joined with others of the Leiden refugees in a petition, later granted, to be permitted to emigrate to America; and, with a wife and five children was one of those who had arrived in New Amsterdam as early as 1626.
Woodruff, Francis E., THE COURSENS OF SUSSEX COUNTY, NEW JERSEY, p.15.
1622Frustrated by the restrictions placed by the English on their request to set up a colony in Virginia, the Walloons (i.e. French-speaking Belgians then residing in Holland) applied in the spring of 1622 to the States of the Province of Holland for transportation to New Netherland as colonists, and the matter had been referred to the Amsterdam Chamber of the West India Company.
J. Franklin Jameson, NARRATIVES OF NEW NETHERLANDS (1909), p.75n.
1623Jean La MONTAGNE, latterly a boarder, with other "students," in the family of Thomas CORNELISZ, on the Breedestraat, in Meat Market Row, is found to have quit the University of Leyden in 1623, and appears to have joined the naval campaign for Brazil.
1623Joris Jans Janssen de RAPALJE, son of Abram JANSSEN, arrived in New Amsterdam in 1623. He married to Catalyntje "Caroline" TRICO of Valenciennes. He lived at Albany, New Amsterdam & Brooklyn, New York, and died ca.1665.
THE SECOND BOAT, v.1, p.7; v.8, p.13;
Orra Eugene Monnette, FIRST SETTLERS OF PISCATAWAY AND WOODBRIDGE (1930), p.489;
Frank L. VanWagnen, ANCESTORS OF GARRET CONRAD VanWAGNEN (1946), pp.65-77, Appendix J;
Margherita Arlina Hamm, FAMOUS FAMILIES OF NEW YORK (1902), pp.61-70;
Frank Allaben, ANCESTORS OF LEANDER HOWARD CRALL (1908), pp.265-298;
Henry A. Stoutenburgh, A DOCUMENTARY HISTORY (1901), pp.440-450;
William A. Eardeley, CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW (1918), pp.201-206.
1624In March 1623/24, a company of Walloons, with their families (about 30 families in all), sailed for America in the "New Netherland," in command of one familiar with the voyage, Captain Cornelis MEY. Captain MEY was to be Governor in New Netherland, with a deputy in the person of Captain Adrian TIENPONT, who accompanied him. This lone ship, and other vessels sent out by the company soon after to the West Indies, were designed merely to secure possession of the country. The grand business at hand was the conquest of Brazil. In December 1623, twenty-two war ships, under the command of Admiral Jacob WILLEKENS, left Holland to operate against the Spanish settlements in the West Indies and Brazil. Among the Walloons who enlisted in this grand naval expedition were Jesse De FOREST and Jean de la MONTAGNE.

On 20 May 1924, in Battery Park, City of New York, near the place where the Walloons landed three hundred years earlier, a memorial was dedicated in their honor The modest monument was fashioned from the granite of Hainault, from which Belgian province the first settlers in New York and the Middle States, originated. The inscription reads:

PRESENTED TO THE CITY OF NEW YORK
BY THE CONSEIL PROVINCIAL DE HAINAUT
IN MEMORY OF THE WALLOON SETTLERS
WHO CAME OVER TO AMERICA IN THE
"NIEU NEDERLAND" UNDER THE
INSPIRATION OF JESSE DE FOREST OF
AVESNES THEN COUNTY OF HAINAUT
ONE OF THE XVII PROVINCES
1624cJohannes Van BRUGH, son of Pieter VERBRUGGE and Helena POTTAI was born, about 1624, in Haarlem, Holland. He married, 24 Apr 1658, to Trijntgen ROELOFS, dau. of Roelof JANSEN and Anneke JANS, and widow of Lucas RODENBURG, Vice Director of Curacoa, who died about the year 1656.

Gillis VERBRUGGE of Amsterdam, in his will dated 3 July 1635, calls this Peter, "Pieter VERBRUGGE my brother." (Archives of Amsterdam. Protocol of Notary J.C. Hogeboom, Inventory No. 839).
N.Y.Gen.Biog.Rec. v.66, p.2-11,166-177.

(Note: According to some the POTTIER's were closely related to the deCOURCYs in Europe.
Ref: Letter from Countess Xavier deCourcy from Paris, France 1973.
See also Tanguay's DICTIONNAIRE GENEALOGIQUE, v.VI, p.412).

On a list of those of French birth who had resided in Olde Ulster before the close of the year 1700 is listed the name of Jean Baptiste du POTIER along with LeFEVRE, HASBROUCK, duBOIS, VERNOOY, de la MONTAGNE, duPUY, BAYARD, GUMAER, and others associated with the CORSSE CORSZEN families.
OLDE ULSTER MAGAZINE, v. ,p. )

1624On 9 Mar 1624, Philippe DuTRIEUX received from the church at Leiden a certificate of transfer "pur West-inde," meaning that he was about to sail for New Netherland. Philippe duTRIEUX was therefore among the Walloons who sailed at the end of Mar 1624 on the ship "Nieuw Nederland."
1624Hendrick Jochemsz SCHOONMAKER (1624-1682c.), son of Jochem SCHOONMAKER, was baptized 29 November 1624, at St. Petri Church, Hamburg, Germany.
Heidgerd, Ruth P., THE SCHOONMAKER FAMILY, Part One (1974).
1625On 4 January 1624/25, Gerard De FOREST appeared before the burgomasters at Leyden and stated that his brother Jesse had "lately departed with the vessels for the West Indies." He requested to be licensed, in his stead, to dye serges and camlets in colors, as the number of dyers engaged in this specialty would not thereby be increased. His request was granted.

In the summer of 1625, the yacht "De Vos" brought news of WILLEKENS' success in Brazil, but reported that Jesse DeFOREST had died (probably at the siege of San Salvador). Bereft of their father while yet under age, the children looked to their uncle, Gerard, for needed counsel; "and there is pleasing evidence that the relations of the uncle and nephews were intimate and confiding."
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.83-85,88.

1625Some Walloon families, headed by Joris (George) Jansen de RAPALJE, settled on Long Island at the "Waal-Bocht," where de Rapalie bought from the Indians three hundred thirty-five acres of land. In Dutch "Waal" means Walloon, and "Bocht" bay, thus it was the "Walloon Bay;" the name had become Wallabout Bay. In that section is the Brooklyn Navy Yard.
Henry G. Bayer, THE BELGIANS: FIRST SETTLERS OF NEW YORK (1925), pp.167-170.
1625Sari RAPALJI, dau. of Joris Jans JANSSEN de RAPALJI and Caroline TRICO, was baptized, 9 June 1625, on Long Island, New York. She is reported to have been the first female child of European parentage born in New Netherland. Sarah RAPELJE married first, 1639, to Hans Hansen Von BERGEN (overseer of a tobacco plantation on Manhattan) and second to Tunis Gysbertse BOGAERT; and she died before 1687 (or 1694), after giving birth to fourteen children. She "was maternal ancestor of the most notable families of Kings County, New York, while old directories of Staten Island show also the name of RAPALJE."
Henry G. Bayer, THE BELGIANS: FIRST SETTLERS OF NEW YORK (1925), pp.167-170;
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.56-59.
1625Sarah du TRIEUX, dau. of Phillip and Susanna (duCHESNE) TRIEUX, was born, 1625, in New Amsterdam. She married, 1641, to Isaac DeFOREST (1616-1674).
1626Jan de la MONTAGNE, left Saintonge, France about 1610 and in 1619 was studying medicine at the Univ. of Leiden, Holland. He had come to New Netherlands with Jesse deFOREST; but upon the latters death, he returned to Leiden with the widow, deFOREST, whose dau. Rachel deFOREST he married first 27 Nov 1926 in Leiden, Holland. He married secondly 18 Aug 1647 to the widow of Arent CORSSE STAM.
See O'Callaghan HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.21n.
1626Upon the death of Jesse De FOREST at Brazil, Jan de la MONTAGNE returned to Leyden, Holland, and enrolled anew at the University there as a "student of medicine, " 7 July 1626. He had taken convenient lodgings on the Voldersgraft with the widow, Marie (Du CLOUX) deFOREST, whose only daughter, Rachel deFOREST, he married as his first wife, 12 December 1626, at the Walloon Church in Leyden. Jan and Rachel (deFOREST) MONTAGNE had children: Jolent, Jan, Rachel, Maria, Jesse, and William. Johannes de la MONTAGNE married secondly, 18 Aug 1647, to Agritta GILLIS, the widow of Elias PROVOOST and Arent CORSSE STAM. See
O'Callaghan HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.21n;
Theo. L. Van Norden, THE VAN NORDEN FAMILY (1923), pp.65-67.

The third child of Jean or Johannes de la MONTAGNE by his first wife was Jean MONTAGNE, born, 1632, in Leyden, who married first to Petronella PICKOLL, and then married as his second wife, 10 June 1663, Maria VERMILYE, born 1629, dau. of Isaac VERMIELLE, and was thus an uncle by marriage of Isaac VERMILYE who married, 16 Jan 1707, to Josyntje OBLINIS, widow of Teunis CORSSE. After the death of Jan MONTAGNE, his widow, Marie VERMILYEA married, 26 Sept. 1675, Isaac KIP.
Mrs. Robert DeForest, A WALLOON FAMILY IN AMERICA, v.i,p.105-106, v.ii,p.285.
James Riker, HISTORY OF HARLEM (1881), p.166,574;
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.784-791.

1626Dirck VOLCKERTSEN "de Noorman" (also known as Dirck HOLGERSEN) came from Bergen, Norway to New Amsterdam, probably in the group of Northmen for which Secretary Isaac De RAISIERE had applied to the West India Company in 1626 --- Northmen who would know how to render pitch from the pines in the New World.
1627Jolent, son of Jean and Rachel (De FOREST) de la MONTAGNE, was baptized in 1627, but "their precious first-born" was "destined soon to be taken from them."
1629Marie VERMILYE, daughter of Isaac VERMEILLE, was baptized, 2 August 1629, at Leyden. Jean DIMANCHE and his wife, Marie VERMEILLE, stood as godparents. Marie VERMILYE married, 10 June 1663, as his second wife, to Jan de la MONTAGNE, son of Jean and Rachel (de FOREST) de la MONTAGNE. Marie VERMILYE married second, 26 Sept. 1675, to Isaac KIP.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.104-105.
1630Dirck VOLCKERTSEN married, before 1630, to Chistina VIGNE, dau. of Guillaume and Andrienne (CUVEILL) VIGNE, Walloons from Valenciennes in the north-eastern part of France (then Belgium).
Daughters of the American Colonists, LINEAGE BOOK, vol.XII, pp.226-228, #11643; v.XIII, p.361-364, #12854;
Virkus THE COMPENDIUM OF AMERICAN GENEALOGY.
1630Arendt CORSSE (Sometimes called "Arendt STAM") and his brother Dirck CORSSE (Sometimes called "Dirck STAM") were both in the employ of the Dutch West India Company as early as 1630-1633. Abraham GREVENRAET and Dirck CORSSEN STAM were sent by Abraham's father, Hendrick GREVENRAET, merchant of Amsterdam, to purchase a cargo of tobacco in Virginia. NY.GEN.BIOG.REC., v.61,p.245. Note: Some of the early deCOURCY'S used the Dutch version of the French name "COURSIER" (pronounced "Coursay") which translates into the Dutch as "STAM" and into English "RACER". In other instances the "COURCY" surname was Dutchified by adding of the "n" sound as in COURSEN in keeping with the traditional Dutch Patronymic naming system.
1630cMathias BECK who had succeeded Lucas RODENBURGH as vice director of Curacao, married Leonora GREVENRAET who was probably a dau. of Guilliam and Aldegonde (BONAERTS) GREVENRAET.
1630On 16 Oct 1630 an association was formed between Kileaen van RENSSELAER, et.al, and Capt. David PIETERSSEN de VRIES for planting a colony on the South River.
1630Albert Andriess BRADT de Norman (1607c.-1686) and Arent Andriesse BRADT, brothers, first emigrated as early as 1630, and were among the early settlers at Rensselaerswyck. They came from Fredrikstad, a town at the mouth of the Glommen, the largest river in Norway. Albert Andriess BRADT, known as "de Noorman" was a land owner and tobacco farmer at Bushwick, New York, 13 August 1630. He established himself a few miles south of Albany on a stream, "Norman's Kil," where he built a mill. He married first to Annetie BARENTS von Rolmers (also called Annitje ALBERTS). They had children: Barent; Eva BRADT, married first, 1647, to Anthony de HOOGES and m. second, 1657, to Roeloff SWARTWOUT; Storm (1636-c.1679) m. Hilletje LANSINCK; Engeltje married Teunis SLINGERLAN of Onisquathaw; Gisseltje married Jan van ETTEN; Andries; Jan; and Dirck. See:
Daughters of the American Colonists, LINEAGE BOOK, vol.XII, pp.226-228, #11643; Helen Wilkinson Reynolds, DUTCH HOUSES IN THE HUDSON VALLEY (1929), pp.64-65;
Rosalie Fellows Bailey, DUTCH SYSTEMS IN FAMILY NAMING (Reprint No. 12, from the NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY - March 1953, Dec. 1953), p.13;
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.19-43;
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND (1848), v.II, p.437.
1630sDavid Pietersen deVRIES, b. La Rochelle, France c.1592 was a Dutch navigator and colonizer. He founded Dutch colonies and trading posts in Brazil and in what are now the states of Delaware, Virginia, and New York between 1630 and 1644. Arendt CORSSE STAM, Dirck CORSSE STAM, and Cornelius Pieterszen CORSEN (CORSSE) were all three at one time in the service of David Pietersen deVRIES.
David Pietersen deVries, KORTE HISTORIAEL ende JOURNAELS (Leiden Holland 1655).
J. Franklin Jameson, ed. NARRATIVES OF NEW NETHERLAND.
C.H.B. Turner, compiler, SOME RECORDS OF SUSSEX COUNTY, DELAWARE, p.71.
1632On 2 April 1632, Capt. John MASON wrote a Letter to [Mr. Secretary COKE?] protesting the presence of the Dutch in New Netherland. See O'Callaghan, v.1, pp.415-417. (John MASON (c1600-1672) of Hartford and New London, CT was an ancestor of Fred P. DECOURSEY of Minneapolis, MN. See Mears-Mason line in another volume in this series.)
1632Johannes VERMILYE (1632-1696), son of Isaac and Jacomina (JACOBS) VERMEILLE, was born, 1632, at Leyden, Holland.
1632Gulian VINGE died before 30 April 1632. His widow, Adriane CUVELLIER married second, 30 April 1632, to Jan Jansen DAMEN. He was probably the "Jan Damont, laboreur" who had signed the round robin of Walloons seeking passage to "Virginia" in 1621. If so, he undoubtedly migrated to New Netherland with the other Walloons in 1624, --- long after the VIGNES had arrived there. After his marriage to Ariaentje CUVEL, Jan Jansen DAMEN removed to New Amsterdam, "where he was elected one of the Eight Men; amassed considerable wealth, and was one of the owners of the privateer La Garce. In 1649-50 he went to Holland with C. van TIENHOVEN, to defend Peter STUYVESANT against the complaints of Van der DONCK and others, and died on his return, 18 June 1651." He appears to have not had children of his own, but he adopted Jan Cornelis BUYS (who assumed his name), son of his sister, Hendrickje (DAMEN) BUYS.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.I, pp.434-5;
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.613n;
NEW YORK COLONIAL MANUSCRIPT, v.1, p.6.

In a settlement with her children by her previous marriage to Guleyn VIGNE, Ariaentje CUVILJE promised each of her married children, Maria and Christina, 200 guilders from the estate of their father, "her lawful husband deceased," and promised each of her unmarried children, Jan and Rachel, 300 guilders plus their keep and schooling until of age. Dirck VOLKERTSEN, Christina's husband, witnessed the agreement. Jan ROOS of Haarlem, Maria's husband, died without having done the same, leaving a son, Gerrit Jansen ROOS. Maria took a second husband, Abraham VERPLANCK of Edam, who had arrived in America in 1634 with his cousin, Jacob PLANCK, the first commissary (clerk) of Rensselaerswyck.
NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY RECORD, v.90, pp.2-14.

1632The third child of Johannes de la MONTAGNE by his first wife, Rachel deFOREST, was Jean MONTAGNE, born 1632 in Leiden, who married first to Rachel MONTOUR and then married, 10 June 1663, as his second wife, Maria VERMILYE, b. 1629, dau. of Isaac VERMIELLE, and was thus an uncle by marriage of Isaac VERMILYE who married, 16 January 1707, Josyntje OBLINIS, widow of Teunis CORSSE. After the death of Jan MONTAGNE, his widow, Marie VERMILYEA married Isaac KIP.
Mrs. Robert DeForest, A WALLOON FAMILY IN AMERICA, v.i,p.105-106, v.ii,p.285.
James Riker, HISTORY OF HARLEM (1881), p.166,574;
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203-207.

Jan La MONTAGNE (1632-1672), son of Jan or Johannes de la MONTAGNE and Rachel de FOREST, was born 1632 at Leiden Holland. He married first, in Holland, to Petronella PIKES (a sister of his partner, Vincent PIKES, and a daughter of Jan PIKES), by whom he had a son Vincent and perhaps a son Johannes who married Annetje WALDRON. Jean Mounier de la MONTAGNE (1632-1672) married second, 10 June 1663, Maria VERMILYEA, who bore him: Abram MONTAGNE married Rebecca TEUNISSEN; Isaac MONTAGNE married Hester Van VORST. Jan La MONTAGNE was one of the leaders of the settlement of Haarlem, on the Island of Manhattans.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.21n;
Theo. L. Van Norden, THE VAN NORDEN FAMILY (1923), pp.65-67.

1633Arent CORSSE (STAM) was commissary at Fort Nassua (now Gloucester, NJ) prior to 1633. In the employ of the Dutch West India Co., in 1633, he purchased "from the right owners and Indian chiefs" land on the east bank of the Schuylkill River, in the old Indian district of Passvunk, and within the present First Ward of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Here a trading post was established to "restrain the encroachments of the Swedes who were boldly pushing their boundaries northward on both sides of the South (now Delaware) River and seeking to monopolize the trade with the Indians." Fort Beversrede was subsequently erected on this site in 1646. Arent CORSSEN STAM was a brother of Dirck CORSSEN.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.I,p.124n,142, 156,156n,359; v.II,p.81,81n;
Theo. VanNorden, VAN NORDEN FAMILY, p.65-66.
N.Y.GEN.BIOG.REC., v.22,p.1, v.9,p.58.
O'Neill's TERRA MARIA, v.I,p.158.
COLONIAL HISTORY OF NEW YORK (1853), v.1,p.280, 588, 593, 598, v.2,p.180.
PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE, v.15 (1891), p.252-253;
HOLLAND DOCUMENTS, v.VIII, p.55.
1633Elias PROVOOST, bapt. 24 October 1606, son of Guilliame PROVOOST and Jenneke Eerdewijns, married Agniet JELLIS on 17 May 1633 at Amsterdam, Holland. Agniet JELLIS had been baptized on 1 December 1611 at Amsterdam, daughter of Gillis Jochem ten WAERT [VERBRUGGE] and his wife Beicken SCHUTS. Elias PROVOOST died in July 1636 and his widow married, second, 26 January 1638 at Amsterdam, to Arendt CORSSE STAM. Elias and Agniet PROVOOST had three children two of which died young. Their son, Johannes PROVOOST, bp. 27 March 1636, Old Church, Amsterdam, married first to Sarah STAATS, dau. of Dr. Abram STATTS of Albany; and he married second, 25 June 1685, to Sarah WEBBERS.
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203.
1633Casper or Jasper VARLETH was a resident of the Dutch settlement of Fort Good Hope (near present Hartford, Conn.) as early as the completion of the Fort in 1633. He married ca.163 to Judith --?-- and had children: Nicholas VARLETH married (1) Susanna Jillis, dau. of Gillis Jansz VERBRUGGE and Barbara SCHUT, and m. (2) 14 Oct. 1656, Anna (STUYVESANT) BAYARD; Mary VERLETH m. (1) Johannes AMBECK or VanBEECK, and m. (2) Paulus SCHRICK; Jane VERLETH; Catharine VERLETH m. Aug. 1657 Francoys de BRUYN; and Judith VARLETH m. 23 May 1666 Nicholas BAYARD.
1634Rachel La MONTAGNE, daughter of Johannes and Rachel (De FOREST) de la MONTAGNE, was baptized, 1634. She married Dr. Gysbert Van IMBROCH or Van AMBURGH.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), Appendix, p.785.
1635Jan de PRE, was born at Commines in 1635, "a Fleming, but of Walloon or French descent, judging from his surname."
1635Gillis VERBRUGGE of Amsterdam, Holland, in his will dated 3 July 1635, names "Pieter VERBRUGGE my brother."
(Archives of Amsterdam. Protocol of Notary J.C. Hogeboom, Inventory No. 839). N.Y.Gen.Biog.Rec. v.66, p.2-11,166-177.
1636Jan JANSEN and his wife Engeltje JANS, from "BREESTED" (Bredstedt, in Schleswig, Denmark), came to New Amsterdam about 1636. They had the following children: Tryntie, who was married to Rutger Jacobsen SCHOONDERWORTH or Van WOERT, and whose descendants assumed the name of RUTGERS; Jan Jansen Van BREESTED, who in 1647 married Marritje LUCAS (ANDRIES); Dorothea JANS van BREESTEDE, who in 1650 was married to VOLCKERT JANSZEN from Frederickstadt, and whose descendants comprise the DOW family of New York; Elsie JANS van BRESTEDE, who was married three times.
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.213-214, 221-224.
1636On 3 March 1636, Dr. La MONTAGNE renewed his membership at the University of Leyden; but he was to soon give up his practice in Holland and leave for New Netherland.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.89.
1636In the year 1636, Henry De FOREST was of the age of thirty years; "his brother Isaac, ---an infant of four months when the bells rang for the great fire at the University of Leyden, --- had grown to be a young man of twenty;" Jean, the eldest brother, a dyer by occupation, had recently taken a wife, and was living at the Hoogerwoert in Leyden; while Jesse, the other brother was dead.
1636Johannes PANHUYSEN, of Leyden, was director of the West India Company, in 1636, and represented Leyden in the Chamber at Amsterdam, in which office he had succeeded Johannes De LAET. Johannes PANHUYSEN had married a daughter of Gerard De FOREST. Gerard's son, Crispin De FOREST, with encouragement from his brother-in-law, laid plans to enter the lucrative tobacco trade in New Netherland, which had taken on new importance, with the failure of that crop in Virginia. The promise of great wealth and a chance to escape the plague that then swept Europe, prompted Henry and Isaac De FOREST to become partners in their cousin's venture and turn their backs on Holland. The plan seemed complete when their only sister, Rachel, and her husband, Dr. La MONTAGNE, agreed to go."
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.89.
1636On Saturday, 7 June 1636, Gerard De FOREST attended his son Crispin and nephew Henry, as voucher for registration of their wedding bans; and on 1 July 1636, a double wedding took place at Amsterdam, Holland. Henry De FOREST, son of Jesse De FOREST, married to Gertrude BORNSTRA. Crispin De FOREST, son of Gerard De FOREST married to Margareta BORNSTRA.
1636After having left a small number of new settlers at New Amsterdam, the ship "King David," Captain David De VRIES, and a company's ship, the "Seven Stars," departed the colony, 13 August 1636.
1636Albert ANDRIESSEN BRADT apparently returned to Holland (perhaps on business), for on 26 Aug. 1636, the following contract was signed at Amsterdam, Netherlands:

"In the name of the Lord, Amen. On conditions hereafter specified, we, Pieter Cornelissen van munnickendam, millwright, 43 years of age, Claesz jans van naerden, 33 years of age, house carpenter, and albert andriessen van fredrickstadt, 29 years of age, tobacco planter, have agreed among ourselves, first to sail in God's name to New Netherland in the small vessel which now lies ready and to betake ourselves to the colony of Rensselaerswyck for the purpose of settling there on the following conditions made with Mr. Kiliaen Van Rensselaer, as patroon of the said colony, etc.

"Thus done and passed in good faith, under pledge of our persons and property subject to all courts and justices for the fulfillment of what is aforewritten, at Amsterdam, this 26th of August 1636.

"In witness whereof we have signed these with our own hands in the presence of the undersigned notary public . . . .

"Killiaen Van Rensselaer
"Pieter Cornelissen
"albert andriessen
"Claes Jansen
"J.Vande Ven, Notary."


John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), p.29.

1636Dirck CORSSEN STAM was an employee of Killian van RENSSEALEAR and supercargo of the "Rensselaerswyck" which brought 38 persons including 6 women & several children to New Amsterdam in 1636. See:
Mrs Robert DeForest, DEFOREST, A WALLOON FAMILY IN AMERICA, v.I,p.71-78,102.
1636The yacht "Rensselaerswyck" set sail from the Texel for New Amsterdam, 1 October 1636, carrying colonists to Fort Orange in the service of the Patroon, Killian Van Rensselaer, of Amsterdam, Holland. Jan TIEBKINS was skipper. Derick CORSSE STAM, brother of Arent CORSSE STAM, was supercargo of the ship. Among the company on board were Henry de FOREST and his bride (Gertrude BORNSTRA); Isaac De FOREST, with his servants, Tobias TEUNISSEN and Willem Fredericks BONT, both natives of Leyden; Albert ANDRIESSEN (BRADT) and his wife Annetje BARENTS of "Rolmers" and two children; and Arent ANDRIESSEN.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.91, 784.
1636An agreement between Albert Andriessen (BRADT), and Kiliaen Van RENSSELAER was signed in Amsterdam, Holland on 26 August 1636. It states that Albert ANDRIESSEN was a tobacco planter. He sailed from Trexel, 8 October 1636, accompanied by his wife, Annetje BARENTS of "Rolmers", two children and his brother, Arent ANDRIESSEN on the ship "Rensselaerswyck," which arrived at New Amsterdam, 4 March 1637. The voyage was through rough seas, and a son born to his wife during the voyage was named "Storm." The log of the ship contains under the date of Sunday, 2 November 1636, the following entry:

"Drifted 16 leagues N.E. by E.; the wind about west, the latitude by dead reconing 41 degrees, 50 min. with very high seas. That day the overhang above our rudder was knocked in by severe storm. This day a child was born on the ship, and named and baptized in England stoerm; the mother is annetie baernts. This day gone."
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.19-43.

1637Maria La MONTAGNE, daughter of Dr. Johannes La MONTAGNE and Rachel de FOREST, was born 26 January 1637, at sea off the island of Madeira. She married, 14 Feb. 1654, to Jacob Hendricks KIP.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.I, p.180n; v.II, pp.21n,213n.
1637On 13 Apr 1637, Dirck CORSSEN, commissioner or skipper of the yacht "the RENSSELAERSWYCK" witnessed the purchase by Killian van RENSSELAER of extensive land surrounding present day Albany, New York. See O'Callaghan, v.1, p.124,124n.
1637George RAPALJE was patentee of an Indian Tract at Papskeena, New Netherland, 16 June 1637.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.581..
1637Henry De FOREST died, 26 July 1637, at New Netherland. His widow, Gertrude (BORNSTRA) De FOREST, married the following year to Andries HUDDE, son of Rutger HUDDE and Aeltie SCHINCKELS.
1637David PROVOOST, bapt. 11 August 1611, Amsterdam, son of Guilliame PROVOOST and Jenneke EERDEWIJNS, winedealer, residing at the Heerenmarckt, married Margrieta JELLIS, on 10 August 1637 in Amsterdam. Margriet, baptized at Amsterdam on 17 December 1617, was the daughter of Jellis/Gillis Jochems Ten WAERT [VERBRUGGE] and Beicken [Barbara] SCHUTS.
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203-207.
1637In a letter dated 21 Sept. 1637 (addressed to Pieter Cornelisz, master millwright and partner to Albert Andriessen), Kiliaen van RENSSELAER sent greetings to Albert ANDRIESSEN.
1638Arent CORSSEN STAM married, 26 January 1638, at Amsterdam, Holland, to the widow of Elias PROVOOST, Agniet JELLIS, baptized 1 December 1611, daughter of Gillis Jochem Ten WEART [VERBRUGE] and Beicken [Barbara] SCHUTS. Arent CORSSEN STAM and Agniet GILLIS VERBRUGGE had one son, Gerrit Arentszen STAM, bp. 7 November 1638, at Amsterdam.
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203-207.
1638David William PROVOST, of a French Huguenot family, came from near Rouen in Normandy, in 1638, to New Amsterdam. His son, Benjamin PROVOST, born at Hartford, Conn., bapt. 17 July 1646, m. 11 June 1666, Sara BARENTS of Haerlem, Holland, afterwards m. 5 Nov. 1671, Elsie Alberts of New York, whose dau. Margaretta PROVOOST, bap. 16 Sept. 1673, married, 21 Oct. 1695, to Jacob CODEBEC.
Cuddeback, William Louis, CAUDEBEC IN AMERICA (1919), p.53. Susanna Jillis, first wife of Nicholas VARLETH, is said to have been a sister of Margaret Jillis, the wife of David PROVOOST.
Purple, Edwin R., HISTORY OF ANCIENT FAMILIES OF NEW AMSTERDAM AND NEW YORK (Privately Printed, N.Y. 1881), pp.81;
SOME OF THE ANCESTORS OF THE REVEREND JOHN SELBY FRAME AND HIS WIFE CLARA WINCHESTER DANA, (Privately published 1948), pp.98-99.
1638The partnership between Albert Andriessen (BRADT) and Pieter CORNELISZ apparently soon broke up; for in a letter dated 8 May 1638, to Peter Cornelisz, Kiliaen van RENSSELAER wrote: "Albert Andriessen separated from you, I hear that he is a strange character, and it is therefore no wonder that he could not get along with you."

On 29 Dec. 1637, Van RENSSELAER wrote to Director William KIEFT that he should assign some of the young men on board the "Calmar Sleutel," commanded by Pieter MINUIT and sailing in the same month, to tobacco planting with Albert ANDRIESSEN "if he has good success," otherwise they were to serve with the farmers.

In a letter of 10 May 1638, to Albert ANDRIESSEN, Van RENSSELAER acknowledged that he had received a letter from Albert ANDRIESSEN stating that the tobacco looked fine; but he was desirous to get full particulars, including a sample of the tobacco. He expressed his dissatisfaction with the dissolution of the partnership between Albert ANDRIESSEN and Pieter CORNELISZ, and wanted to know the cause of Albert ANDRIESSEN's dispute with the officer and commissary Jacob Albertsz PLANCK and his son. He informed ANDREISSEN that he was obliged to uphold his officers, and promised that he would stand by him and cause him to be "provided with everything;" however, he would not suffer bad behavior. He also informed him that he had heard from several people that he was "very unmerciful to his children and very cruel" to his wife; and he was to avoid this "and in all things have the fear of the Lord" before his eyes and not follow so much in his own inclinations. Van RENSSELAER also censured Albert ANDRIESSEN for cheating Dirck CORSZEN STAM. It seems that Albert ANDRIESSEN had traded furs with Dirck CORSZEN STAM, contrary to contract; and for seven pieces of duffel he had given him only the value of twenty-five merchantable beavers.

Later it seems that Van RENSSELAER suspected that Dirck CORSZEN STAM was an unfaithful supercargo and at fault in the matter of the furs, and he wrote to Albert ANDRIESSEN, 13 May 1639, that he should write him the truth of the matter and pay him (RENSSELAER) what he still owed Dirck CORSZEN. If Albert ANDRIESSEN was to act honestly, he was to receive supplies for himself, his people, and the Indian Trade, at a discount from superintendent Arent van CURLER. Van RENSSELAER informed Albert ANDRIESSEN that he would try to sell his tobacco at the highest price and give him a bonus; however he complained that some of the barrels of "tobacco was so poor and thin of leaf that it could not stand being rolled." The shipment was also short of the weight shown on the manifest. He cautioned Albert ANDRIESSEN to improve his quality and keep better accounting of expenses and receipts from tobacco.

The patroon, Van RENSSELAER, had several disagreements with the brothers, Albert and Arent ANDRIESSEN over their accounting practices and operation of the tobacco plantation; however, they apparently were showing a profit for the patroon, so he seems to have tolerated them.
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.21-22;
Van Rensselaer Bowier Manuscripts, pp. 409-411, 446, passim.

1638Willem KIEFT, the third Director-general of the New Amsterdam colony, arrived at the Manhattans on 28 March 1638, in the Herring, one of the Dutch West India Company's ships. His first step, on his assumption of the reins of Government, was to organize a council of which he should retain the entire control. He named to the board, Doctor Johannes La MONTAGNE, a learned Huguenot gentleman, who had arrived in the country in the course of the preceding spring or summer, to whom he gave one vote, while he reserved two to himself. Cornelius van TIENHOVEN, a native of Utricht, and one of the oldest residents in the province, who had hitherto acted as book-keeper for the Dutch West India Company, was promoted to be colonial secretary; and Ulrich LUPOLD was continued as schout-fiscal, or sheriff, and attorney-general. Among the other officers and servants of the company were David PROVOOST, commissary of provisions; Jacob van CULER, inspector of merchandise; Jacob STOFFELSEN, overseer; Philip de TRUY (du TRIEUX), court messenger; Gerrit SCHULT and Hans KIERSTEDE, surgeons; Frederick LUBBERTSEN, first boatswain; Tymen JANSEN, ship-carpenter; et.al.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.I, p.180-181.

(Frederick LUBBERTSEN and his first wife, Styntje HENDRICKSE lived at what is now the northwest corner of Maiden Lane and Pearl St. on Staten Island. They were the maternal grandparents of Maritje van de GRIFT, who became the wife of Cors Pietersen's eldest son, Capt. Cornelis CORSSEN. This house was sold about 1657, by Fredrick LUBBERTSEN, to Maria Du TRIEUX (widow of Cornelis VOLKERTSEN) and her second husband, Jan PEEKE, who occupied the house until about 1660, when they sold it to Cornelis CLOPPER.)
Orville Corson, THREE HUNDRED YEARS WITH THE CORSON FAMILIES IN AMERICA (1939), v.1, pp. 33-34.

1638On 1 May 1638, Dirck HOLGERSEN (Dirck VOLKERTSEN?) gave a note to Director KIEFT for 720 guilders.
1638From about 1632, Dirck VOLCKERTSEN and Abraham VERPLANCK had made their home with their wives' mother, Ariaentje CUVILJE, and step-father, Jan Jansen DAMEN. Their families grew, and in 1638, when old Jan DAMEN tired of being steward for all of Guleyn VIGNE's offspring, he threw the whole bunch of VOLKERSENS and VERPLANCKS out of the house, injuring Dirck VOLCKERSEN's wife, Christina (VIGNE) VOLCKERTSEN, in the process. In July 1638, Jan Jansen DAMEN brought suit against Abraham VERPLANCK and Dirck HOLGERSEN: "On motion of the plaintiff the defendants were ordered to quit his house and to leave him master thereof." Dirck however, charged Jan DAMEN with assault and furnished witnesses who testified "regarding an attempt of Jan DAMEN to throw his step-daughter, Christine, Dirck's wife, out of doors."

The VOLCKERTSENS settled at Green Point, across the East River; and the VERPLANCKS at Paulus Hook, across the North River.
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), p.69;
Calendar of Historical Manuscripts, v.I, p.163.

1638Derrick CORTSEN STAM and Arent CORTSEN STAM were granted "a Parcell of land in James Island, conteyning 10 po. in breadth and 8 po. in length," 11 October 1638, "Near adj. to Capt. William PEIRCE his store. Graunted by Act of Assembly, 20 Feb. 1636 &c. Fee Rent: 1 Capon on the feast of St. Thomas, provided &c."
CAVALIERS and PIONEERS, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623-1800, v.1, p.98.
1638Cors PIETERSE, also known as Cornelius Pietersen VROOM, (born ca.1612, probably son of Peter de COURSE), stated in affidavits in 1638 and 1639 that hew was then aged 26 years and from "Langeraer" (about 6 miles from Leiden, Holland). He married Tryntje HENDRICKS, dau. of Hendrick TOMASSEN and Elsie MARTENSE. See:
Rosalie Fellows Bailey, DUTCH SYSTEMS IN FAMILY NAMING (Reprint No. 12, from the NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY - March 1953, Dec. 1953), p.10.
1639On 18 May 1639, Director KIEFT leased to Dirck HOLGERSEN, a "bouwery and stock on halves."
1639Sari RAPALJI, dau. of Joris Jans JANSSEN de RAPALJI and Caroline TRICO, married first, 1639, to Hans Hansen Von BERGEN. He was overseer of a tobacco plantation on Manhattan. They had children: Anneken; Brecktje; Jan; Michiel; Joris; Marretje; Jacob; and Catalyn.
Henry G. Bayer, THE BELGIANS: FIRST SETTLERS OF NEW YORK (1925), pp.167-170;
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.56-59.
1639In June 1639, George BERLEMYER was indentured to serve Teunis CRAY for one year.
1639On 22 Sept 1639, --?-- Abbesen assigned all his rights to the maize land near Fort Hope to Teunis CRAY.
1640Joost OBLINUS, son of Joost and Martina OBLINUS, was born, 1640, in Holland.
1640It appears that Isaac VERMILYE (recorded as Isaac WURMEL on civil records) may have spent some time at Mannheim between 1637 and 1660.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.105.
1640Abram RYCKEN was patentee for land on Long Island, 8 May 1640, and for a lot in New Amsterdam, 8 April 1643.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.581;
Rosalie Fellows Bailey, DUTCH SYSTEMS IN FAMILY NAMING (Reprint No. 12, from the NATIONAL GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY QUARTERLY - March 1953, Dec. 1953), p.6;
William A. Eardeley, CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW (1918), pp.61-65.
1640Philip DeTRUY was patentee of land at Smith's Valley, Manhattan, 22 May 1640.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.581.
1640Aeroudt, child of Cornelis VOLKERTSEN VEILE and Mary deTREIX was baptized 27 May 1640. Witnesses were Isaac deFOREST, Jan CANT, and Teunis CRAY, Schipper (Captain).
NY.GEN.&BIOG.REC v.57,p.216.
Orville Corson, THREE HUNDRED YEARS OF THE CORSEN FAMILY, v.1,p.97-103.

According to one record, "Mary duTRIEUX earlier had an illegitimate dau. by Cornelius VOLKERTSEN VIELE, and Peter Van COUWENHOVEN adopted this child."
NY.GEN.&BIOG.REC v.83,p.147.

Aeroudt CORNELISEN VIELE is credited with being the first white man to view the Ohio River.

Cornelis VOLKERTSEN VIELE was the grandfather of Elizabeth and Blandina VIELE who married the brothers, Jacob and Benjamin CORSSEN, Sons of Capt. Cornelis CORSSEN and Maritje van der GRIFT. VIELE was from Kniphausen in Oldenburg. He sailed for New Netherland on the ship "de Eendracht" which left Holland in May 1634. He returned on the same ship, which reached Amsterdam before 3 Dec 1635, having worked his way over on the boat.
Minutes of the Amsterdam Chamber of the West India Company, 1635-36; see NY.GEN.BIO.REC., v.49,pp.224,228.

Cornelis VOLKERTSEN VIELE and his wife, Marye du TRIEUX had four children baptized in the DRC of NA
NY.GEN.BIOG.SOC.Collections, V.2,PP.10,14,19,24.
Orville Corson THREE HUNDRED YEARS WITH THE CORSON FAMILY, p.97-103.

Note: It appears as though the VEILE surname was earlier CUVEILLE in France.

1640Teunis CRAY of Venlo gave receipt for two imported "milch cows" which he hired from the Company, 20 June 1640.
1640Jean Mosnier de la MONTAGNE was in chief military command in Manhattan from 1640-1645.
1641Isaac deFOREST married, 1641, to Sarah duTRIEUX, dau. of Philip duTRIEUX and Susannah DE CHINEY (De CHESNE).
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), Appendix, pp.781-784.
1641Derek CORSON on papers dated 13 July 1641 gave his age at that time as 33 years old. He would have been born in 1608. He served the Dutch West India Company for several years. He worked the cargoes.
Information from Della N. PENNEY of Duquesne, PA.
1641Anthony de HOOGES entered the employ of the the Patroon of Rensselaerswyck as under bookkeeper and assistant to Arent van CURLER. He sailed from Trexel, 30 July 1641, on "den Coninck David," the skipper being commanded to allow him to eat and sleep in the cabin. The translation of this order of the West India Company is as follows:

"The directors of the West Indian Company, Chamber of Amsterdam order and direct Job ARISSEN, skipper of the ship named "d' Co. David" to transport in said ship under his command and to permit to sleep and eat in the cabin the person of Anthony de Hogus in the service of Mr. renselaer and Johan Verbeck with his wife and daughter and maid servant, and Geertgen nanninx, with son and little daughter, provided he bring with [him] a musket or firelock and sword of [his] own, with his accompanying baggage specified below and marked with the mark of the Company; and for transporting these the skipper shall upon [declaration] signed by said Anthony de Hogus, be paid for board --- stivers a day, according to the amount agreed upon with Mr. renselaer for board of his colonists. Done at Amsterdam, the 10th of July 1641. ss. Fredr: Schulenbr:"

Anthony de HOOGES brought letters of introduction to Director General William KIEFT and also to Arent Van CURLER, to whom he was sent as an assistant. On his voyage (which was an unusually stormy passage), he kept a journal, which was sent to Killian Van RENSSELAER and excerpts from which are printed in OLDE ULSTER HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE, v.5, pp.240-245. That Van RENSSELAER admired and thought highly of young Anthony de HOOGES is evident in letters from RENSSELAER to van CURLER, Domine MEGAOPOLENSIS, and HOOGES himself.
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.30-33.

1641On 29 August 1641, a board of "Twelve Men" were chosen by the commonalty at large to co-operate with Director General Willem KIEFT and the council. This was the first elected representative body of record in what is now New York. These delegates were David Pietersen De VRIES, Jacques BENTYN, Jan DAMEN, Hendrik JANSEN, Jacob STOFFELS, Maryn ADRIAENSEN, Abram MOLENAER, Fredrik LUBBERTSEN, Joachim PIETERSEN, Gerrit DIRCKSEN, George RAPELJE, and Abram PLANK.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND (1845), p.242-3.
1641"In 1641, Governor Kieft sent Dr. Johannes de la MONTAGNE as temporary commander at Fort Hope," a Dutch fur-trading post on the Connecticut River where the city of Hartford now stands. "The Fort was settled shortly after 1624, according to tradition, by Walloons. Its chief civilian was Casper VERLETH, whose son Nicholas VERLETH married first, Susanna JILLIS, supposed sister of Margriet GILLIS Ten WAERT, and second, in 1656 Anna STUYVESANT, sister of Gov. Peter STYVESANT and widow of Samuel BAYARD."
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203-207.
1641William Monjour La MONTAGNE was born in 1641. He was for several years secretary to the town of Kingston. He married, 1673, Eleanor de HOOGES, dau. of Anthony and Eve Albertse (BRATT) de HOOGES.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.I, p.180n; v.II, pp.21n,213n.
1641Rachel, dau. of Dirck and Christine (VIGNE) VOLCKERTSEN, was baptized 8 Sept. 1641. Sponsor was Laurens PIETERSEN Noorman.
1642On 2 January 1642, the Fiscal arrested Gerrit GERRITSEN and Dirck HOLGERSEN (VOLCKERTSEN) for stealing rope from the yacht of the West India Company. GERRITSEN was brought to the guard house in chains; while HOLGERSEN was ordered not to leave until the case had been decided. Two weeks later, HOLGERSEN declared, on oath, that he had bought the rope of GERRITSEN in good faith. GERRITSEN and the sailors of the yacht "Reael" were ordered to appear next day in court to draw lots for punishment, or meanwhile satisfy the Fiscal. John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.69-70; Calendar of Historical Manuscripts, v.I, pp.78-79.
1642Cornelis VOLCKERTSEN was fined in 1642 for having kept a disorderly house.
1642cAlbert Heymanse ROOSA married about 1642, to Wyntje Aariens de Jonge, dau. of Adrian Miertensen de Jongh. They had children: Arien ROOSA m. Maria, dau. of Evert PELS; Heyman ROOSA m. Margaret ROOSEVELT; Jan Albertse ROOSA m. Helligoud Williams vanBUREN; Aaghe ROOSA m. 1670 Dr. Roeloff KIERSTED; Mary ROOSA, m.1672, Laurens Jansen KORTRIGHT vanBEEST, son of Jan BASTIAENSEN; Neeltje ROOSA m. 1676 Henry PAWLING; Jannetje ROOSA m. 1679 Mathys Ten EYCK; Wyntjen ROOSA m. Nicholas DePUY; Aert ROOSA; Annetje ROOSA; Guert ROOSA. OLDE ULSTER HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL MAGAZINE, v.8, p.233-243; James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.412n; Eva Alice Scott, JACOBUS JANSEN VAN ETTEN (1952), p.133-135.
1642In February 1642 Teunis CRAY was given power of attorney to Frans Joosten of Bruges.
1642Anthony de HOOGES, as assistant to Arent van CURLER, was credited from 10 April 1642 till 10 April 1644, with a salary of f. 150 a year.
1642David de VRIES, Director General Willem KIEFT, Joachim Pieterszen KUYTER and Jan Jansen DAMEN were the first churchwardens and consistory to superintend the erection of a church of the Reformed Religion on Staten Island in 1642. - J. Franklin Jameson, NARRATIVES OF NEW NETHERLAND (1909), p.212,212n,226; E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND (1845), p.260.
1642Jannekin, dau. of Teunis CRAY and Tryntie van CAMPEN, was baptized, 4 May 1642, in the Dutch Reformed Church of New Amsterdam. She married Dirck JANSZEN.
1642Arendt CORSSE gave a power of attorney to Govert LOOKERMAN of New Amsterdam, dated 4 Aug 1642, to receive moneys from one David PROVOST. CALENDAR OF THE N.Y. HISTORICAL MSS., part I,p.19. Percival G. Ullman THE COURSENS,p.16-17.
1642On 31 August 1642, Catalina TRICO and her daughter, Sarah RAPALJI, made a declaration "respecting the conduct of Tryn JONAS, midwife, when sent for to attend said Trico." (Note: Tryn JONAS was mother of Anneke JANS who married first to Roelof JANSEN and second to Everardus BOGARDUS.) John O. Evjen SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.89-115.
1642Rem Jansen VANDERBEECK married, 1642, to Jannetje RAPALJE, daughter of Joris Jansen and Catalyna (TRICO) RAPALJE. Their descendants took the surname "REMSEN". See: THE SECOND BOAT, v.8, p.13:
1642Herck SYBRANTS (also known as Hendrick SIBOUTSEN KRANKHEYT), married, 1642, to Wyntje Theunis CRAEY and thus was an uncle to Metje Theunis CRAY who married Jan CORSZEN in 1673. Herck Siboutssen's daughter, Tryntje, married Ryck Abrahamsen LENT. She was Mother of Maria LENT who married Abraham VanAMBURGH, and grandmother of Elizabeth van NOMBERG who married, 10 Nov 1726, to Teunis CORSA (Dennis DeCOURSEY). On 28 Aug 1650, Herck SIBRTS and his wife Wyntje CRAY were witnesses at the baptism of Jan, son of Hendrick CORSENS. See James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.166; William A. Eardeley, CHRONOLOGY AND ANCESTRY OF CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW (1918), pp.33-35.
1642Teunis CRAY agreed, as part of a lease, to plaster and make a house tight once, to enclose a yard in the rear, and to lay wood in. On 1 December 1642, he contracted for a post and rail fence around his land. In 1642-43, he rented a small house on the corner of present Bridge and Broad St. for 40 guilders a year.
1642Elsie Janse (VanBREESTEDE) was in the service of Cornelis MELYN of Staten Island, who brought suit against Egbert WOUTERSZEN, husband and guardian of Engeltje Jans, her mother, for damages on account of Elsje's marriage engagement before her term of service to him had expired. At the trial, 11 Sept. 1642, Elsie Janse (VanBREESTEDE) testified that her mother and another woman had brought a young man to Statten Island whom she had never seen before, and desired her to marry him. She declined at first, as she did not know him and had no inclination to marry, but finally she consented. She concluded her testimony by returning in court the pocket handkerchief she had received as a marriage present.

On the 16th of October following, she made a declaration that she sent for Adrian PIETERSEN and that on his coming to Staten Island, she accompanied him on board his yawl.

A week later, MELYN and the Fiscal had PIETERSEN before the Court charged him with Elsie's abduction. PIETERSEN was ordered to bring her into court, deliver her to MELYN, and receive her again from him on giving security for the payment of any damages that Melyn may have suffered.


Heidgerd, Ruth P., THE SCHOONMAKER FAMILY, Part One, p.4;
NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD (1876), vol.VII, p.117;
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.212-213.

1642In November 1642, Dirck HOLGERSEN conveyed to Govert AERTSEN a house and lot on Manhattan Island.
1643In the fall of 1642, there had been some incidents of violence by renigade Indians. After some traders had stole a dress of beaver-skins from an Indian whom they had previously stupefied with brandy, he vowed revenge. An Englishman in the employ of David De VRIES was killed shortly after; and in a few days following, Gerrit Jansen Van VORST was also slain, while engaged roofing a house. The chiefs of the tribes, desiring peace, offered restitution to the Dutch, but it was refused by KIEFT. In February 1643, in spite of the warning of cooler heads such as Johannes La MONTAGNE and David Pietersen De VRIES, who counselled patience, humanity and kindness to win over the Indians, KIEFT, at the urging of a militant group led by Jan Jansen DAMEN, Abraham PLANCK and Maryn ADRIAENSEN, ordered a pre-emptive sneak attack on the Indians at Pavonia. Over One Hundred and Twenty Indian Men, Women, and children were slaughtered in their sleep.

According to one account, "Sucklings were torn from their mothers' breasts, butchered before their parents' eyes, and their mangled limbs thrown quivering into the river or the flames. Babes were hacked to pieces while fastened to little boards --- their primitive cradles! --- others were thrown alive into the river; and when their parents, impelled by nature, rushed in to save them, the soldiers prevented their landing; and, thus, both parents and offspring sunk into one watery grave. Children of half a dozen years; decrepit men of threescore and ten, shared the same fate. Those who escaped and begged for shelter next morning, were killed in cold blood, or thrown into the river. Some came running to us from the country, having their hands cut off; some lost both arms and legs; some were supporting their entrails with their hands, while others were mangled in other horrid ways too horrid to be conceived. And these miserable wretches, as well as many of the Dutch, were all the time under the impression that the attack had proceeded from the terrible Mohawks."

This senselessly violent act by the Dutch Soldiers infuriated the previously peaceful Indians surrounding New Amsterdam, and this act was to prove troublesome to the white colonists (both Dutch and English) in the future.

The dismay felt by the Indians following this massacre was expressed in the words of an Indian sachem of the Manhattans, addressed to Ambassador David Pieterszen de VRIES at a subsequent peace conference: "When you first arrived on our shores, you were often in want of food. We gave you our beans and our corn. We let you eat our oysters and fish; and now for a recompense, you murder our people. The men whom you left here at your first trip, to barter your goods until your return, we cherished as we would our eyeballs. We gave them our daughters for wives, and by these they have children. There are now numbers of Indians who come from the mixed blood of the Indians and Swannekins (white man). Your own blood have you spilt in this villanous manner."
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.1, pp.263-278.

1643Tradition says that Guleyn VIGNE's wife, Ariaentje CUVILJE, had been endowed by her schismatic forbears with a violently rebellious streak, and it was reported in Holland that she played football with Indians' heads brought to Fort Amsterdam after KIEFT's unholy attacks in 1643. Following the massacre of the Indians by the Dutch soldiers at Pavonia, Ariaentje CUVILJE, "Van TIENHOVEN's mother-in-law, forgetful of those finer feelings which do honor to her sex, amused herself, it is stated, in kicking about the heads of the dead men which had been brought in, as bloody trophies of that midnight slaughter."
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.I, p.269.
1643On 24 February 1643, in spite of the pleadings of David Pietersen De VRIES, Jan de La MONTAGNE, and the Rev. BOGARDUS for patience, humanity, and kindness towards the Indians, Jan Jansen DAM, Maryn ADRIAENSEN, and Abraham PLANCK, three members of the late board of the "Twelve Men," signed a letter to Director General KIEFT advocating an attack against the Indians. They presented the petition in the name of the commonalty from which they had no authority.

KIEFT assented to this plea, and the resulting outrages against the Indians in February and their retaliation in March threatened to be almost fatal to the Dutch Colony.

In March, Captain David P. DeVRIES and Jacob OLFERTZSEN volunteered to meet with the Indian Sachems to negotiate a peace. On 22 April 1643, De VRIES concluded a Peace Treaty with some of the tribes.

The peace, which had been concluded in the spring, was considered by the River Indians in every respect unsatisfatory. The presents they had received were looked upon as by no means commensurate to the enormous losses which they had experienced at the hands of the white men. Pacham, the leader of the Tankitekes of Haverstraw, stimulated the Indian villages to rise and massacre the Dutch. Hostilities again commenced.

KIEFT, who never respected either popular rights or popular representatives, found himself in a position that he had to consult the commonalty. The people met at the fort and were called upon to elect representatives. Joachim PIETERSEN, Jan DAMEN, Barent DIRCKSEN, Abraham PIETERSEN, Isaack ALLERTON, Thomas HAL, Gerrit WOLFERTSEN, and Cornelis MELYN were chosen as a board of "Eight Men" to advise the Director. Among the electors of this board were Teunis CRAY, Jacob STOFFELSEN, Reyner JANSEN, Albert JANSEN, Isaac de FOREST, Govert LOOCKMANS, Jacob COUWENHOVEN, Willem ADRAENSEN, Jan VERBRUGGE, Benjamin PAWLEY, Cornelis VOLCKERS, Abraham PLANCK, Heindrick Heindricksen KYPE, Laurens PIETERSEN, Cornelis Lambertsen COOL, Claes Jansen RUTGER, et.al.

At the first meeting of the board of Eight Men, Jan Jansen DAM was excluded from the board, as the others refused to sit with him, he being one of the three signers of the letter of the 24 of February demanding permission to attack the Indians.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND (1845), p.265-6, 284-5.

1643Kiliaen Van RENSSELAER complained in a letter of 16 March 1643, to Arent van CURLER Albert ANDRIESSEN had received special privileges, since "his cows are not mentioned in the inventory sent him." Van CURLER was ordered to include the cows in the inventory or make Albert ANDRIESSEN leave the colony and pay for pasturing and hay for the past year.
Van Rensselaer Bowier Manuscripts, p. 661-663, 696.
1643On 9 April 1643, Teunis CRAY joined in a complaint filed by Peter VANDER and Barnet DIRKSEN.
1643Adriaen PIETERSEN of Alcmaer was in Manhattan by 3 March 1640. His first wife was Grietje PIETERS. He married 2nd, 17 May 1643, Elsie Janse, daughter of Jan Jansen VanBREESTEDE and Maritje ANDRIES, and stepdaughter of Egbert WOUTERSZEN. Elsie's children by Adriaen were: Jannetje m. Jan Barentsen KUNST; Syntje m. Jacob Abramsz SANTVORT; Lysbet, d.y.; and Pieter, who was brought up by his step-father, Hendrick Jochemsz SCHOONMAKER, and shared equally in his estate.
Heidgerd, Ruth P., THE SCHOONMAKER FAMILY, Part One, p.4;
Hood, Dellman O. THE TUNIS HOOD FAMILY (Portland, Oregon 1960), pp.12-20,37-46, passim;
1643David PROVOOST was patentee of a lot in Dew Amsterdam, 2 June 1643.
1643Arien ROOSA, son of Albert Heymanse ROOSA was born 3 June 1643, in Holland. He married Maria, dau. of Evert PELS.
Eva Alice Scott, JACOBUS JANSEN VAN ETTEN (1952), p.133-134.
1643Jan Gilliszen VERBRUG joined in signing a petition of election, 13 Sept. 1643, with Theunis CRAY (father-in-law to be of Jan CORSZEN). He was a son of Gillis Jansen VERBRUGGE (also known as Joakin Ten Waert) and Barbara SCHUT; and brother to Angeneta Gillis who married first Arendt CORSSE and second Johanne VERMILYEA; and also brother to Margaret Jillis who married David PROVOST and was ancestor of Rachel vanGORDEN who later married Teunis CORSA (Dennis DECOURSEY).
1643Volckert Dircksen, son of Dirck and Christine (VIGNE) VOLCKERTSEN, was baptized 15 Nov. 1643.
1643Christina (VIGNE) VOLCKERTSEN, wife of Dirck VOLCKERTSEN, was sponsor for a child of Roland HACKWARDT on 14 December 1643.
1644Cornelis van de VEN and Janneke GREVENRAET (dau. of Jasper and Paulina (CORSSEN) GREVENRAET) baptized a child in Recife, Brazil in 1644. - See:
NY.GEN.BIOG.RECORD, v.13,p.10, v.60,p.202, v.61,p.41,245, v.63,p.10-21, v.64,p.149.
1644Jacob le MAIRE was an official in the Dutch colony in Brazil, 1642-54. He married Catrina Van der VEN, daughter of Cornelis and Janneke (GREVENRAET) Van der VEN.
N.Y.G.&B.R., v.64, p.149.
1644Adrian VIGNE was patentee of a double lot in Manhattans, 25 April 1644.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.581.
1644In May of 1644 between four and five hundred persons in the Dutch West India Company's service at the Dutch outposts in Maranham and Recife, Brazil were forced out by the Portuguese and were forced to take refuge in Curacoa. "As it was impossible to furnish, or indeed to procure food for so many people, it was determined to remove the greater part of them to New Netherland. One Hundred and thirty soldiers under the command of Captain Jan de FRIES, and a number of other persons the whole amounting to about two hundred souls, were accordingly embarked on board the Blue Cock, commanded by Captain Willem Cornelissen OUDEMARKT, for New Amsterdam. See
O'Callaghan, v.I, p.309-310.309n, 423-424.
1644Cornelius van TIENHOVEN was patentee of 12 morgens, 14 July 1644.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.581.
1644A lease held by Jan DAMEN on land located at the intersection of the modern Exchange Place and Broadway expired in 1644. It was on this land that was later located the house and tavern of Cornelis VOLKERTSEN and his wife Maria Du TRIEUX, whose granddaughter, Blandina VIELE, married Benjamin CORRSEN, a son of Captain Cornelis CORSSEN of Staten Island.
Orville Corson, THREE HUNDRED YEARS WITH THE CORSON FAMILIES IN AMERICA (1939), v.1, pp.33-34.
1644Jan Broerse (DECKER) came from the West Indies in the "Blue Cock" in 1644, and settled in Albany. He served under Jacob Hay (HUYS) in the West Indies, and was probably a teen-ager at the time (probably no more than 14 years old).
1644On 13 September 1644 Teunis CRAY, Isaac DEFOREST, Jan VERBRUGGE, and others met under the direction of KIEFT to elect six representatives to consider propositions on how to best deal with providing for the refugees from Brazil.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.1,p.283-285.
1644Upon Arendt Van CURLER's departure for Holland, in October 1644, Anthony deHOOGES was entrusted with the position of acting commissary-general, or superintendent of the colony of Rensselaerswyck. He served as business Manager of the colony until Van SCHLLICHTENHORST's arrival on 22 March 1648.
1644Arendt CORSSE had one Moerheart Laurens Cornelison arrested in 1644, for expressing himself disrespectfully of one Doretor (Director?) KIEFT. See
COLL. OF N.Y. HISTORICAL MSS., p.28; Ullman, p.17.
William KIEFT was Governor of N.Amsterdam from 1637-1647.
1645Gerretje, dau. of Theunis CRAY and Tryntje van CAMPEN, was baptized, 8 Jan 1645. She married Jan Geritszen de VRIES van DALSEN.
1645Following the Indian war of 1643-45, the families of Dirck VOLCKERTSEN and Abram VERPLANCK returned to Manhattan Island and eventually moved to houses built on adjoining lots in Smit's Valley. (Pearl St. from Wall St. North).
1645Dirck VOLCKERTSEN was patentee of 25 morgens at Mespath, 3 April 1645.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.583.
1645Cornellis, son of Cornelis Pieterse VROOM CORSSE and Tryntje HENDRICKS was baptized 23 Apr 1645 in the DRC of NA. He married 1666 Marrytje JACOBS van der GRIST. He was named in a patent 30 Dec 1680 and was designated "Captain" in a record at Albany, 21 Dec 1680. He died 7 Dec 1693. Among the bequests in his will dated 8 Oct 1742 were all his lands in Hunterdon Co., New Jersey "to his sons Douwe and Benjamin." Cornelius CORSSEN VROOM had sons: Jacob; Cornelius, bpt. 13 Aug 1681, a Justice of the Peace on Staten Island; Christian, a judge and Lt. Colonel in 1738; Daniel, bpt. 8 Feb 1690; and Benjamin who removed in 1726 to Bucks County, PA and left descendants who used the DECOURSEY surname. See
Orville Corson's THREE HUNDRED YEARS WITH THE CORSON FAMILY.
Also see
Ira K. Morris, MEMORIAL HISTORY OF STATEN ISLAND.
J.S.Schenck, HISTORY OF WARREN COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.
Rev. A. Stapleton, MEMORIALS OF THE HUGUENOTS IN AMERICA, p.80.
AMERICAN ANCESTRY, p.163.
1645Arendt CORSSEN was a plaintiff on 15 Aug 1645.
COLL. of N.Y. HISTORICAL MSS., p.911.
Also Ullman, p.17.
1645Jacob Du TRIEUX, son of Phillip and Susanna (duCHESNE) TRIEUX, was born, 1645, in New Amsterdam, and died, 1709, at New Castle County Delaware. He married Elizabeth POST who was still living in Delaware in 1730.
THE SECOND BOAT, v.3, p.50-52
1645Isaac De FOREST was patentee of a lot in the Manhattans, 5 Sept. 1645.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.583.
1645Abram RYCKEN was patentee for a lot in the Manhattans, 14 Feb. 1646.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.584.
1646In 1646, the present site of Ynkers, N.Y. was granted to Adrain Van der DONCK, known as de Jonkheer (young nobleman). Philipse Manor, which became a state museum is located there. Frederick PHILIPSE, first lord of the manor, married Cantharine Van CORTLANDT.
THE SECOND BOAT, (July 1989) Vol.10, No.3, p.6.
1646Elias and Benjamin, twin sons of David PROVOOST and Margiet GILLIS Ten WAERT [VERBRUGGE], were baptized at the DRC of NY on 22 or 17 June 1646. Sponsers were Secretary Cornelius Van TIENHOVEN, Olof Stephenszen Van COURTLAND, Anneken LOOCKERMANS, Jillis Van BRUG, Arent KOOS and wife (maybe Arent CORSSEN STAM and wife Agniet Jillis Ten WAERT).
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family,"
Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203-207.
1646Lysbeth, dau. of Theunis CRAY and Tryntje van CAMPEN, was baptized, 29 July 1646, in the Dutch Ref. Church of N.A.
1646Adrian Van der DONCK says that he and KIEFT saw an Indian painting his face with a shining mineral. They had it assayed, and it proved to contain "gold". Arent CORSSEN van Corenben was sent to Holland with a bag of the yellow metal (later confirmed to be iron pyrites). The "great ship" of New Haven, Captain George Lamberton, sailed at Christmas, 1646, or New Years, but the ship foundered at sea. Arent CORSSEN, Kieft's messenger, was drowned, and "misfourtune attended all on board." The swamped ship return into the harbor as a phantom ship, months afterward. See Cotton Mather's
MAGNALIA, (1853),v.I,p.84 and Longfellow's poem, "The Phantom Ship."
Franklin Jameson, NARRATIVES OF NEW NETHERLAND, p.299;
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.I, p.359.
1646Arendt CORSSE STAM, died, in 1646, at sea. His widow, Angenetta Gillis VERBRUG (also known as Angenietie Gillis Ten Vaert), dau. of Gillis Jansen VERBRUGGE and Barbara SCHUT, married third to Johannes de la MONTAGNE, an official of the Dutch West India Company and Vice Director of Fort Orange. See
REGISTER OF NEW NETHERLAND, p.49.
1647On 15 April 1646, Claes CARSTENSEN (1607c.-1679) married Hilletje HENDRICKS; and on 25 March 1647, he acquired 50 morgens of land on the west side of the North River in New Jersey, next to Dirck STRAATEMAKERS (Dirck the Streetpaver). It had formerly belonged to Barent JANSEN. CARSTENSEN sold it the same year to Jan VINJE, a Walloon, and in 1667 it became the property of a Dane, Laurens ANDRIESSEN. Claes CARSTENSEN died, 1679, at the house of Johannes VERMELJE, and it appears he left no relatives.
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.51-53;
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), p.360.
1647Hans HANSEN von Bergen acquired a lot, 13 March 1647, south of Fort Amsterdam "between Jan SNEDEKER and Joris RAPALJE," that is next to his father-in-law. On 30 March, the same year, he acquired land on Long Island "on the kill of Joris RAPALYEY bounded by Lambert HUYBERTSEN's, Jan the Swede's plantation and by Mespath Kill as far as Dirck VOLKERTSEN." This was at the head of the Kill of Mespath (Indian name for Newton), or Newton Creek, a section called by the Dutch "t Kreuppelbosch," now corrupted Cripple Bush. The grant amounted to 400 acres.
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), p.59;
J. Riker, ANNALS OF NEWTON (1852);
1647cHendrick Jochemsz SCHOONMAKER, a native of Hamburg, Germany, came to America in the service of the Dutch West India Company, and was a lieutenant "in the company of his noble Honor the Director General."
1647Joris RAPELJE was a patentee for a lot in the Manhattans, 18 March 1647.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.585.
1647Teunis CRAY and C. Teunis SCHOONMAKER were patentees for lots in the Manhattans in New Amsterdam, 15 April 1647.
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.586.
1647In 1647, Teunis CRAY built a house with a gabled front on the corner of Stone and Broad Streets, with an outside oven in the rear. He dug a deep well nearby.
1647Dr. Jan de La MONTAGNE, "with brightened prospects, and about to wed the widow of Arent CORSSEN STAM, who two years previous, sailing for Holland on the public service, had perished at sea, took occasion, 9 May 1647, only two days before his friend KIEFT closed his directorship, to secure a patent for the farm Vredendal," 100 morgens of land in the Manhattans.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), pp.149-151;
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.586.
1647Dirck VOLKERTSEN was given power of attorney, on 2 July 1647, by Albert GOVERTSEN to receive money from the West India Company.
1647Angenetta GILLIS, widow of Arendt CORSSE, applied for a marriage license on 18 July 1647. She married, third, to Johannes de la MONTAGNE. See
N.Y. HISTORICAL MSS. (Dutch), pp.111-316; Percival Ullman, p.17;
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203-207.

"Derick CORSSEN STAM, supercargo in the vessel which brought the De FORESTS over, had a brother Arent, whose widow, Agnes, a daughter of Gillis Ten Waert, was wooed by the Doctor (Jan de La MONTAGNE), after the death of his wife, Rachel De FOREST. As Arent had been lost at sea, it proved an obstacle to their union, but this was overcome, as is shown by the following proceeding of 18 July 1647: 'Mr. Johannes La MONTAGNE appeared before the council, and requested leave to marry Angenietie Gillis Ten Waert, widow of Arent CORSSEN. Being fully persuaded that he perished, as the Lords Directors have written, that they had left nothing untried to learn about him, but were entirely ignorant of his fate; therefore if Mr. La MONTAGNE, and she Angenietie, have no scruples regarding it, they are at liberty to marry.' Two months later they were married." Johannes and Angenetta La MONTANGE had two children: Gillis and Jesse; both children died young.
James Riker, REVISED HISTORY OF HARLEM (1904), Appendix, p.784.

1647Barbara PROVOOST, dau. of David PROVOOST and Margiet GILLIS Ten WAERT [VERBRUGGE], was baptized at the DRC of NY on 15 August 1647. Sponsers were Dr. Johannes de la MONTAGNE and Agniet Jillis Ten WAERT.
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203-207.
1647Johannes de la MONTAGNE, after the death of his first wife, Rachel deFOREST, married as his second wife, 18 Aug 1647 at New Amsterdam, to Agritta Gillis VERBRUGGE, widow of Elias PROVOOST and of Arendt CORSSE (also know as Arendt STAM). Johannes and Agniet de la MONTAGNE had children: Gilles de la MONTAGNE, pb. 18 September 1650 NYRDC; and Jesse de la MONTAGNE, bpt. 6 April 1653 NYRDC. Both children of this marriage died young.
Mrs. Robert DeForest, A WALLOON FAMILY IN AMERICA, v.i,p.105-106, v.ii,p.285.
James Riker, HISTORY OF HARLEM (1881), p.166,574;
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203-207.
1647Anthony de HOOGES married second, October 1647, to Eve Albertse BRATT, dau. of Albert Andriesz BRADT, "the Norman," and Annetje Barents (vonROLMERS) BRATT. (According to Evjen, Anthony de HOOGES was a widower with several children.) Anthony and Eva (BRADT) de HOOGES had children: Marie; Anna, married Warnaar HORNBEEK; Catharine; Johanis; and Eleanor, married William de la MONTAGNE.
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.30-33.
1647At the resignation of Governor KIEFT and the arrival of Peter STUYVESANT in New Amsterdam, "Doctor La MONTAGNE was continued of the Council (from 1647-1655); Cornelis Van TIENHOVEN, Provincial Secretary; Paulus Leendertsen Van der GRIST, commander of the Great Gerrit, was appointed to the responsible office of Equipage Master or Naval Agent; and 'as none of the Company's officers could tolerably read or write the English language,' Ensign George BAXTER was retained as English secretary."
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.II, p.21n
1648Anthony de HOOGES held the office of secretary and "gecommitteerde" from the arrival of Van SCHLICHTENHORST on 22 March 1648 until his death, on or about 11 October 1655.
John O. Evjen, SCANDINAVIAN IMMIGRANTS IN NEW YORK (1916), pp.30-33.
1648In April 1648, during the building of Fort Beversrede on the Schuylkill River (present site of Philadelphia) by the Dutch, the Swedes (who had built an outpost down river) protested and cut down every tree around or near the fort. The Swedes contended that they had made first claim to this territory, and that the Dutch were encroaching. Intelligence of this act having been received at Fort Amsterdam, Vice Director DINCLAGE and the Honorable Johannes La MONTAGNE were commissioned to proceed to the South River. On their arrival, they obtained from the Indian Sachems a confirmation of the original transfer to the Dutch (represented by Arent CORSSE), of the lands around the Schuylkill, and took public and lawful possession of the same.

Hol. Doc. viii, 55, contains this confirmation of which the following is a translation: "We the undersigned, AMMATTEHOORN, ALEBACKINNE, SINQUEES, rulers over the territories and lands lying on and around the Schuylkill, called Armenveruis, declare well and truly, that we sold to Arent CORSSEN the Schuylkill and adjoining lands for certain cargoes, which were not paid to us in full; but whereas we are now fully satisfied therefore, &c., the aforesaid chiefs do hereby grant a full and irrevocable transfer thereof, confirming the aforesaid sale, and are prepared on all occasions to confirm this, and to free it from all contradiction and gainsay, to be made by any one against the same, &c. Thus done; and in testimony of the truth, signed by us Natives in presence of the underwritten witnesses. Actum in Fort Beversreede in the South River of New Netherland; was subscribed -- the mark of AMATTEHOORN; the mark of SINQUEES; the mark of ALABACKINNE; the mark of MICHECKSOUWABE; &c. in presence of us subscribing witnesses, signed Augustyn HEERMANS, Govert LOOCKERMANS, Juriaen BLANCK, Cornelis Jansen COELE (COOL), Sander LEENDERTSEN, all witnesses to the first contract."
E. B. O'Callaghan, HISTORY OF NEW NETHERLAND, v.1, pp.81,81n,166n.

1648Gerrit, son of Theunis CRAY and Tryntje van CAMPEN, was baptized, 10 May 1648.
1648Adriaen EVERWOU, young man "uyt de Noorman" was married 12 July 1648 at Groede, to Janneke Van AKEN, spinster from Tielt (in West Flanders). Wintesses to the marriage are Jan MARINISSE and Josijntje, her sister.
VAN AKEN NEWSLETTER (15 May 1989), v.6, p.17.
1648Samuel PROVOOST, son of David PROVOOST and Margiet GILLIS Ten WAERT [VERBRUGGE], was baptized at the DRC of NY on 22 November 1648. Sponsers were Dr. Johannes de la MONTAGNE and Marritje SNYERS.
Harriet Holcombe, "The Provoost Family," Society of Descendants of Johannes de la Montagne Newsletter (Spring 1985), v.3, p.203-207.
1649Dirk VOLKERTSON, the Norman; early settler and farmer, Brooklyn at Bushwick Creek; built his house in 1649; he and his wife, Christina VIGNE, became members of the Dutch Reformed Church in New Amsterdam in 1649. Their daughter, Magdalena Dirks, married (1) Cornelius Hendrickson VanDORT, and married (2nd) 1657 Herman Hendrick ROSENCRANS.
Virkus THE COMPENDIUM OF AMERICAN GENEALOGY.
1649Harmanus Hendrickszen ROSENKRANTZ came from Bergen, Norway to New Amsterdam about 1649. He was a soldier, and was sometimes called "Harman the Portuguese" probably in recognition of his service in Brazil, from which reinforcements had been brought in 1655.
BOSTON TRANSCRIPT (8/15/59), #C3236;
NEW YORK GENEALOGICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY RECORD, v.90, p.8.